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What do CFSB Coaches Eat?-Brandon’s Story

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In this video we sit down and chat with the founder, CEO, and co-owner of CrossFit South Bend, Brandon Wilton about his nutrition. We talk about -5 crock pots going at a time -yacht-stuff -taco night -looking good naked -Sheet cakes from Wal-Mart -Silver beach pizza -fluctuating carbs -goals vs. fantasies Brandon tells us: -what eating was like growing up -his journey from unhealthy eating to healthy eating. -his current eating regimen -how he meal plans during the week -lessons he's learned from training at a high level and coaching others in terms of food consumption Lots of great nuggets in here so be sure to check out the full video. __________________________________________________________________________ - Hey guys, Robby here from Crossfit Supplement today. I'm here with Coach Brandon who is the co-owner and CEO of Crossfit South Bend and today we're going to be talking to him about what he's eating. Alright, Brandon, thanks so much for being with us today, appreciate it. - Thank you, Robby. - You're welcome. So first of all, tell us about what eating was like growing up. - It was traditional. I actually when I was talking to my parents last night and I called my mom to make sure that my memory was still on point. Cereal for breakfast, normal traditional American stuff. You're looking at peanut butter and jellies, pizza rolls, something like that for lunch. We always had, I remember this distinctly, like theme night. Spaghetti night, taco night, pizza night, all those kinda nights. She did cook good food. She wanted to make sure we get that out. She did make homemade chicken noodle soup which was fantastic, still love to this day. But yeah, they worked real hard for us, so that's a shout out to my parents, love you guys. - So tell us about the journey, we'll get to what you're eating currently in just a second but tell us about the journey from when you started find out about how to kind of eat healthy to now, like what did that journey look like? You know, finding out about the zone and paleo and all these different things. - Yeah, in the past it was kind of, you know, you have me growing up through adolescence and you're getting your information through marketing. You know, you're getting it through Flex Magazine or your bro that says you need to eat more protein, and you know, do whatever it is, and you stop in vitamin shops, they give you horrible advice. Now I don't wanna say vitamin shops specifically but any kind of supplement store like that they're just gonna give you, you know, some just general advice. Then we get into the Crossfit era and it made me a little more dogmatic about things. You get onto the zone and you get into things like that. I weighed and measured in the zone for two years aggressively, blocks, blocks, blocks. And then, you become less and less dogmatic, ideally, and you start to realize that there is no one size fits all. There's no right diet for anyone. There is only principles that work for some people and better for other people. So you have to be more self-aware of what works really well for you and what your goals are, in training, in life, and in nutrition and things like that, and what's sustainable for you in your life. So I think being really honest with that happened over the last three or four years since I started working with OPEX and some of my mentors and things like that, and having a ton of discussions with you and stuff like that, so yeah. - So, tell us what eating is like now. How do you eat on a day-to-day basis? And we'll talk about your meals. Tell us about everything with regard to how you're eating now. - How am I eating now? So, everyone out there in the audience if you saw Mitch's and Carl's video, they prepared, they said they prepared meticulously some meals, their stuff doesn't look like that, I'm gonna tell you that right now. It doesn't look like that, this is real stuff. So, typically, what I like to do, and what happens more often than not is Costco runs on Sundays. Bulk food, I think I've got like five crock pots at home, that's an exaggeration, I've got like three or four, but things go in crock pots. I generally have an idea of how much protein I eat a day which extrapolates to how much per month that I'll actually need, and that goes into some just general type containers. What I'm gonna do is make a bunch of proteins, my carbs are coming from vegetables and I usually keep carbs here at the gym cause I'll eat most of the carbs post-workout, fueling for that, or sometimes, depending on my training, I may not need as many carbs so it's just trivial here. Things are cooked in fat, and because I know I don't do too well with nuts most of it's just coming from oils and things like that. So I cook in bulk. And, what do we got here? We got some chicken casserole. That was in a big 'ole thing. Dump a bunch of eggs and chicken in there. I make things for fuel and for taste, it has to have a decent blend. If you ask some of the other coaches here, it's gotta be primarily for taste and what have you, but I mean, I'm cooking in bulk and I'm cooking fast and that's the way I prefer to do it. We've got some turkey burgers and check it out, rice. Half of it's gone. I cooked most of it up yesterday, used half of it post-workout. Other half's going today. So most of it, and I want to express this, and I went to Whole Foods cause I didn't have enough protein the other day. I can't tell you why that happened, but with that being said, I cook in bulk and I do it all at once. And you know, it's kind of the parent life for people who say that food is either too expensive, you go to Shelton's Farms, you go to some of those other places, you get in bulk and maybe I spend two hours cooking. It doesn't really take all that long to make a lot of it, maybe three depending on what you wanna make, but you just make all this stuff in bulk and I eat nothing fancy. - So, one of the things we like to do with these videos is, with Andrew we talked about the fact that he was a student, Mitch is training to go to regionals, Carl rugby player, rugby coach. You're a CEO, OPEX certified coach, you've trained for the Crossfit Open, you've done a 50-mile run. Tell us about what you found works best for you with performance and all the things you have on your plate, cause you got a lot of different stuff you're trying to take care of. What sort of unique things have you learned about the way you work best in terms of fueling for training and things like that? - Well I think it's important to note that a lot of people have these goals, and sometimes, very often they're fantasies, they're not actual goals. You know, I can talk about yachting and talking about sailing the world, but unless I'm actually studying how to do yacht stuff and saving up, then it becomes, it's a fantasy and it's not an actual reality. So when it comes to stuff like that people, you know they say they have these lofty goals that they're trying to eat for or trying to do nutrition for. In the past I did more competitive stuff and then being CEO and then being more aggressive with business practices, I had to pull back the goals to match that because, you know you've gotta be aware of what leavers you need to pull and how much you need to fuel yourself, cause it's a full-time job and you have to kind of pick and choose, but that being said, you know with my goals just being longevity and feeling good and performing well enough, I'm not trying to go to the games or go to regionals but I like to be strong, and you know, everyone wants to look good naked. They want to feel good, have good energy, sustained energy through the day and perform reasonably. There's no reason I have to do a triple back-flip handstand pushup, you know. So yeah, that's kind of what I'm eating for right now is just longevity and health and you know, all that kind of stuff, and then my diet reflects that. Mostly protein, as much as I can kind of digest. I pay attention to my digestion. A little under, actually a gram per pound of body weight right now. Fat winds up being about .6 grams per pound of body weight, and carbs fluctuate. I push the carbs when I'm having a heavy day, and then on a day like today I may come in and drink a little coffee with some butter in it and some protein powder in the morning and then I may fast if I'm not doing much training throughout the day and then get on to it. - So tell us about nutritional off-roading, so what are your top three to five off-plan foods and what are some of your special occasions that you like to have off-plan foods for? - So even if it is a special occasion, when I feel like my will power is high - have you ever had somebody offer you some of your favorite foods and you're like you know what I don't really want it, I take advantage of that. I take advantage of that. Will power being a depletable resource, when I have good will power, no thanks. When I'm having bad will power, we know what that's like, then what I do is I still try and talk myself out of that kind of stuff, but special occasions, you're looking at some pizza. I like pizza, Silver Beats Pizza. Some baked goods, and then tacos, yeah that kinda stuff just normal food, but it's gotta be good, can't be a sheet cake from the grocery store or anything like that, you know? - Yeah, can't be a sheet cake from Walmart. - Yeah. - So last thing is any advice? You know, you've been at this for a long time, any advice to people who are starting out, trying to change their diet for the better or any thoughts on your journey and what you've learned and what you could teach others nutritionally? - Yeah, I think it goes into a lot of what we do as a business. You know, move slow, enjoy the journey, enjoy the process, don't get obsessed with the destination. You should be aware of where you wanna be, but just because your weight hasn't changed in one or two weeks what you do is you pimp it and you change and you notice. You look for explanations. You change something. You prescribe something different, you action it, and then you just go through concentric circles of that just again and again and again until you find what works for you. You know, so one is enjoying the journey and enjoying the process and learning yourself and being very aware of that. Don't be dogmatic. Just because somebody's a vegetarian or they do this diet or that diet, if it's working for them great, good on you, that's fantastic. You know, it's kinda hard to fit all those things. Don't make nutrition sexy. Pay attention to, be wary of marketing and what marketing's doing for you. Educate yourself. Learn to flip it over and look at the back of the ingredients and start to understand that and just be aware of what you're doing. So yeah, those three things are a good start. - Awesome, well thank you so much for joining us today Brandon, appreciate it.
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Are you a sugar burner or a fat burner?

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Are you a sugar burner or a fat burner? Well, honestly speaking, no one is purely a sugar burner or a fat burner. We all use some balance of carbs and fat for fuel. However, most people today are way more dominant towards the sugar/carb burner side of things rather than fat. Unfortunately there are some major downsides to primarily being a carb/sugar burner: -you feel like you need to eat every two hours -you feel like you're on an energy roller coaster throughout the day. -you get hangry regularly (hungry+angry) -it's harder to wake up in the morning -you wake up from sleep in the middle of the night more frequently -you never get to burn fat because you're constantly replenishing carbs with no chance to tap into your fat stores So, being predominantly a carb/sugar burner is not so great from a health perspective. We want more of a balance between fat and carb burning for most people (hard charging athletes in power sports potentially being an exception). Generally speaking you should think of carbs and sugar as rocket fuel for more explosive activities (rugby, football, wrestling, MMA, Crossfit, etc.) One of my favorite sayings from John Welbourne of Power Athlete is: earn your carbs. I think this is certainly true for most people and most people do not need a ton of carbs to fuel their daily activity. So, what about being a fat burner? what are the upsides to that approach? First, from purely rom a biological perspective we can only store a few thousand calories of carbs in our liver and muscle cells as glycogen, but even the leanest body can store HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS of calories in fat. So, tapping into those fat stores taps into a major source of clean energy. Furthermore, fats are more clean-burning than carbs, meaning that fat produces fewer harmful metabolic byproducts when utilized for fuel. For pretty much any human activity that happens below 75% exertion (walking, cleaning, basic weight lifting, etc.) fat should be the primary fuel. Also, from a biological and evolutionary perspective, we're supposed to be able to go a few hours at a time and sometimes a few days at a time without eating. The only way to do that metabolically is to tap into our fat stores. Being a more of a fat burner has the following upsides. -you have more energy throughout the day -you sleep better -you don't constantly crave food (no more hanger) -you are able to burn excess body fat more easily So, generally speaking having a proper balance of fat and carb burning is very important for overall health. Most of us are predominantly carb/sugar burners, and switching our fuel source over to fat a bit more is generally beneficial.
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Zita’s Story-I’m in Control of My Food Choices Now

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In this video we sit down with Zita to talk about her journey with the nutrition coaching program. Zita's story is unique for a few reasons. She's a business owner, and she's a mom of 5. So she has a lot of responsibilities on her plate. Her story is also unique because when we were transitioning to real whole food she felt better but her weight didn't budge as much. However, as soon as we did the Whole30 with Zita her weight started dropping much more rapidly and her energy and endurance were way better. A lot of her old clothes are sliding off, and people have noticed. Zita said the biggest thing for her that she learned from the program was how to be in control of food instead of food controlling her. When all was said and done Zita: -Lost 18lbs total -Even more impressive 16.2 of those 18lbs were pure fat -She kept her muscle mass almost exactly the same throughout the entire program (not easy to do when you're losing weight) Zita we're so proud of all that you've accomplished! Keep up the great work!
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What do CFSB Coaches Eat? Chad’s Story

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In this video we sit down to chat with Coach Chad to discuss his food choices: what he grew up eating, how he started eating healthy, what he eats now, his favorite off-plan foods, and his food advice for anyone with a crazy schedule like his. This video is definitely a bit bittersweet because after a couple years of coaching at the gym, Chad is leaving his coaching role at the gym to further his career as a firefighter. I think I speak for everyone when I say he'll definitely be missed. (I'm not crying, you're crying) We also had a special guest star, Chad's dog Scout who told us about her food choices as well. Chad has a very unique situation in that he is a firefighter and he's going back to school. So in addition to having a crazy schedule he has a lot of commitments to keep up with, and through all that he's still able to eat real whole food a lot of the time. He gave great advice in the video about how to juggle all those things. Chad, we wish you all the best in the future!! ___________________________________________________________________________ -Hey guys! Robby here from CrossFit South Bend today. I am here with Chad and I'm here with his awesome dog Scout, who is accompanying us today. So Chad, thanks so much for being with us today. - Sure. - So today, we are going to talk about food. So, the first question I want to ask is, what was food like for you growing up? - So, growing up, it was all junk food. Kind of like, we ran around, every meal was from a box. Like, including cereal with water, you know. When we'd cook on our own. But, macaroni and cheese, you know, or we'd eat out every other night of the week. So, it was pretty unhealthy. - Yep - Yeah. - And, when did you start to find out about, kind of, eating more healthy, and what was that journey like up to this point? - So, when I joined the fire department, they told me I was way to skinny so, they said I was like 110 pounds, so, I was like okay, well I'm gonna start eating. And it was like I'm eating like Burger King and stuff like that. So, I started working out. And, I was like okay, I'm working out so maybe I should eat healthy. And then I was starting to eat healthy, and then I was like maybe I should stop smoking. And, kind of snow-balled this healthy lifestyle. - And, what's food like for you now? Tell us about like what you eat on a typical day, typical week, and then if you brought some stuff with you. - So, I eat pretty plain. I call it bachelor chow. That's pretty much like food mixed together. So, like today I have, this is like my Chipotle bachelor chow. So, she's gonna try to go for that. So, I'll always get a carb. So, cilantro rice, I made up. Cilantro lime rice. Some chicken, and then some veggies. I always want to throw in a veggie, whether that's just having a spinach salad, before a meal or, I really don't like veggies that much. I know that's kind of taboo to say. - That's alright. - But, I've got to get them in. So, I always have them in. So, I'll throw like spinach in my eggs, or whatever. But, it's pretty plain. It's protein, carb, veggie. - Yep. - Yeah. - So, one of the things I was thinking about, with this videos, I like to try highlight the unique aspects of each persons life. So, you are a firefighter, going to school, doing a bunch of different things. What tips and tricks have you kind of learned, you know time management, and cooking, and grab this on the go. What sort of things have you learned in the process eating healthy, while maintaining the schedule that you have? - Definitely meal prep. For breakfast, when I'm at work I always make, like I'll bring ingredients, for my lunch, it's always prepared, already cooked, ready to go. 'Cause our time between breakfast and lunch we could have a bunch of calls, so, that meal is always pre-made. Then dinner, I'll bring ingredients and cook fresh, because I prefer not to eat reheated meals, but sometimes it's just a necessity. - Gotcha. Scout did you want to share your meal? That looks pretty gourmet. - Oh, I'll talk for you. So, here we have dog food, dry, I think it's Purina One, large breed, she eats it every day, so she must like it. In fact, do you want to try some now? She loves it. See? - she loves it. And she's off camera - Low bearer frenchy with dogs, it's like, is it edible. Even then. - For a while she had her own Instagram, And, I wanted to make her a foody, but since she's a dog, it was the same picture every day of the same bowl, the same food. I don't think people got it. - Ya, pretty good guess. So, tell us about off plan food. What are your top, I don't know, two-three, like holy-shit, I love this. You know, peanut butter, pizza, ice cream. Like what are your favorite off plan foods? - Definitely, pizza, deep dish, Chicago style. Oh man, I'm in heaven. That, and then brownie ice cream, big time, for dessert. Every time. - Any particular place you get for brownie ice cream? - Well, what was that place we went to? Korachka's? - Yeah, that was pretty good. - That was pretty darn good. I mean my blood sugar was like 400, but. -That was after the insulin shot. - Yeah. That was after three insulin shots, actually. Yeah. - What are some special occasions? What are some times, for some people it's like Thanksgiving, or their birthday, or what are special times you like to have special off time food. - Usually the first day of my four day, is usually honestly like - yeah it's like okay, time to still, I don't go hog-wild or anything like that. But, I might treat myself to dinner. I might have a burger with dinner, or a beer, or whatever. - Gotcha. And, you know. Let's say you were talking to someone who was you know, in a similar situation, going back to school, firefighter, just, you know, crazy shift work schedule. Like, what would you say to someone who has a similar schedule, where they're trying to get healthy, but they don't quite know what to do? What advice would you give, or what thoughts do you have, now having gone through that yourself? - So, when it comes to food and really training, I want the least stress as possible. - Yeah, absolutely. - So, people will get out scales and measure, and I've done it too, measure food, and make sure I've this much carbs, this much protein. For me, it's just eat real food, like try not to eat out of a box. And, if you're shopping on the exterior of your supermarket, that's where you're gonna find the real food. And, if you stick to that, I think you're gonna be doing pretty good. I mean if you are in a body building competition, then maybe dial in your macros, but for me, that's really stressful, and I'm not doing any bodybuilding. - Yep. No, couldn't agree. clearly - Well no, couldn't agree more like, yeah, just eat real, whole, food, don't stress out about it too much. Awesome. Well, thank you guys so much for joining us today. - Thank you. Appreciate it. - Alright guys, thanks so much for tuning in. See you guys next time.
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Top 5 Ways to Save Money on Produce

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In this video we talk about the top 5 ways to save money on produce at the grocery store. 1. Use the Environmental Working Group's Dirty Dozen and Clean Fifteen list to save money. Use this list to buy organic off the dirty dozen list and save money by not buying organic on the clean fifteen list. https://www.ewg.org/foodnews/dirty-dozen.php 2. Buy local and seasonal fruits and veggies. A strawberry is a lot cheaper in July than December. Not only is this cheaper, but local and seasonal produce actually tastes better. 3. Use a CSA-a community supported agriculture group. You get a box of surplus veggies and fruits each week, and you get exposure to new ones that you might not have used before. 4. Go for vegetables over fruits. This not only saves you money but it's way better for your health. Fruits are way more expensive than vegetables and are not nearly as good for your health as vegetables. 5. Buy the whole vegetable or the whole fruit. Any time someone is cutting something up for you at the store it will cost you a lot more than cutting it up yourself.
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Which Body Type Are You? Ecto, Endo or Meso?

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In this video, we talk about the three main body types, namely the ectomorph, the mesomorph, and the endomorph. You may not be familiar with these terms but I'll bet when I describe them you'll recognize them. Ectomorph-Typically tall and skinny. Can eat anything they want without gaining a pound. But on the flip side it's hard to gain muscle. Mesomorph-Naturally athletic. Rarely has to lose weight, but unlike the ectomorph can build muscle fairly easily. Endomorph-Short, stocky, big-boned. Easily gains size, which is good for muscle gain, but bad for fat loss. Looks at a cake the wrong way and gains a pound. The reason that the three of us did this video together is that each of us corresponds to the three main body types. Brandon (green shirt)-Ectomorph Carl (gray shirt)-Mesomorph Robby (red shirt)-Endomorph These categories of body types can give you some initial insight into which macros are better for you. For example, ectos tend to do better with carbs, whereas endos do not. It can give you a sense of your natural strengths and weaknesses and which sports might be best suited to you. You're not going to see many (any?) endomorphs in the NBA or as long-distance runners, but on the flip side it will be a cold day in hell before you see any ectos as football lineman or heavyweight powerlifters (for the most part). These types aren't set in stone, but they can give you extra insight into whether you're going to have to expend way more energy to gain muscle (ecto) or lose fat (endo). Here's a great article on the subject: https://www.precisionnutrition.com/all-about-body-type-eating Sorry that I'm kind of cut off visually in the video. But you guys probably see enough of me in these videos anyway :)
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Marlo’s Story-I Need a New Wardrobe (In a Good Way!)

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In this video we sit down to discuss Marlo's story. In terms of Marlo's body composition she has: -Lost 35lbs -Kept her muscle mass the same even with the weight loss. -Lost 12.5% body fat -Lost 5.5 inches off hips -Lost 3.5 inches off waist But she also gained so much more than that: -She gained control over her food choices. -She says she has a much better mood overall -She says she now looks forward to activities with friends -She needs to get a completely new wardrobe (in a good way!) Marlo has been one of the most disciplined people I've ever worked with, and I'm so proud of her and her progress. Keep up the great work Marlo! __________________________________________________________________________ - Hey guys, Robby here from Crossfit South Bend, today I'm here with Marlo, who is just about to finish her six months of one-on-one nutrition coaching. So Marlo, thank you so much for being here today. - Thank you. - So, first thing we're gonna talk about is Marlo's progress. So we have her most recent InBody scan here. Marlo basically since her first scan, has lost about 35 pounds, which is crazy. It's amazing. Her muscle mass has basically stayed the same at 61 pounds. And then, she dropped 12.5% body fat. And in addition to that, she lost 5.5 inches off her waist and 3.5 inches off her hips. So, congratulations, Marlo - Thank you - Fantastic job. So, tell us a bit about what food and health and life was like before you started the program. What made you interested in this? What were you eating before this? Tell us what life was like during that time. - During that time, prior to doing all of this, I spent a lot of time trying to eat healthy, but not having the correct information to be able to do that. So, I think I was doing a lot of the things that people think are healthy, but then when you really drill down into whatever the ingredients were, or how it was prepared and things, it's really not. So, a lot of yogurts in the mornings and things like that, and salads, but there was always the more frequent cheat days than not. And it was the 'Oh, well I had a really stressful day,' 'so it's okay for me to have a couple of cookies.' 'That won't hurt anything.' So, I think a lot of people fall into that. Where we're trying, but we don't have the knowledge base to really see the results that we want to have. - Absolutely. So, tell us a little about the journey. You've been doing this for about five months at this point. Tell us about transitioning to real whole food, and then the whole 30. Tell us when your end's been like. - Well, when I started the nutrition coaching, I think we did about, we started officially in June, so, it was a couple of months of me prepping myself, and prepping my kitchen, to be prepared to have the tools in place necessary to succeed. I cleaned out my kitchen probably way before I needed to, just because I knew I wouldn't be able to dive in just like eating what I was eating and then suddenly the very next day, not eating that stuff. So, it was a couple of months of prep work. And then I honestly had a serious talk with myself the night before I was officially going to start because I wanted to succeed. So, I made sure that I was ready to go. And so that talk with myself was about 'it's 30 days.' 'You can do this for 30 days.' But then the journey itself, it was tough at times. Different social occasions, a lot of families, mine is no different, with the rewards for food and family dinners, always having two or three desserts to choose from, and things like that. So, it was definitely an up-and-down sort of thing. In the beginning, lots of energy. I felt that initial rush of being able to, the positive results, and then when I started to see the results, and not just feel them, that kind of pushed my motivation to another level to continue. - Absolutely. Yeah, just for context guys, Marlo voluntarily decided after doing her first Whole 30, to do a second month, which has just been like, that takes tremendous will power. And, it's been a huge boon in terms of how much progress you've made. So, we talked a lot about scale victories and percent body fat, and you've lost a ton of weight, and you said before we started filming that you needed to get a whole new wardrobe essentially. - Yes I'm in the process of purchasing a whole new wardrobe. - So, tell us a bit about the non-scale victories. You're mentioning the energy before, things like recovering from workouts, mood, cravings, tell us about other things that improved in your life. - The biggest piece, for me, is my overall mood and affect. I, at time, have to push myself through bouts of depression. I am not one to take medication, so I don't take medication for that. And, over the course of the last several months, I have felt my overall mood, my stress level, and all the things that I would battle, to do certain things in my life, has gotten much easier. And that, I think is, for me, one of the most positive outcomes of this whole thing. Because I knew at times, I just didn't want to do things. And I would push through that, and I would do them, but I wouldn't necessarily enjoy them as much as I could. And now, it's like, I'm the one whose calling my friends, to be like 'Hey, let's go do something', or that sort of thing. And so I am overjoyed with that, that feeling. - That's fantastic. That's awesome. So, one of the main points of our program is does someone feel like, after the program's done, they can do it long term? Do they feel like they can make this a sustainable thing? Having done this, how do feel this will be in terms of making this a life-long baseline that you can refer back to and make the foundation of your healthy eating? - I feel much stronger since doing the second month. Coming off of the first 30 days, I felt confident and felt that I was much more educated than I had been. But I still felt like I was still battling a lot of the cravings and feeling weak at times, not as strong as I wanted to be coming out of the first 30 days. So that was my big push for doing the second 30 days. Now, I do feel much more confident that I will be able to sustain this for longer periods of time. I don't foresee myself ever not falling off the wagon when it comes to certain things, but I do feel much more confident being able to sustain and, if necessary, come back to it if I've fallen off the wagon too far. That I will be able to pull myself back, because just having that knowledge base now is so much, so key to the success. - Awesome, that's fantastic. So, last question is, if you could talk to Marlo six months ago, or to someone who might be in your situation today, whose unsure whether they could eat this way, or has similar work obligations and things like that, what would you say to someone whose thinking about taking the plunge but isn't quite sure in hindsight? - First I would be honest and say, 'it is a challenge'. - Absolutely. But, two, it is not insurmountable. Having your assistance was super beneficial, being able to tap into your knowledge base and the questions that were asked, so I would just drill it down to, you can do it, do it, do it, do it. Avail yourself to the opportunity to improve your health, because, yes, it's a challenge, but in hindsight, it wasn't something that was so, it wasn't terrible. It was a challenge, but it was not terrible. And if folks are, I don't want to say, as lucky as me, but I felt like I was seeing results fairly quickly which helped keep that momentum going. So, do it! That's what I would say. - Yeah, and I just have to say, from my end, as a coach, you've been one of the most disciplined people I've ever worked with. You've done a fantastic job of sticking with things for your goals. And I am super proud of the progress you've made. And I think you've done an excellent job. - Thank you, thank you. - Alright guys, that's Marlo's story. Thanks so much for tuning in. We'll see you next time.
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What You Need to Know about Nutritional Studies

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Depending on when you read or watch the news meat will either kill you or it won't. Alcohol is both good for you and bad for you. And low carb is the best thing ever except when it lowers your life span. Welcome to the wonderful world of nutritional studies, and the sensationalism that surrounds them. It's no wonder people are confused about what to eat and what's good or bad with all the misinformation and sensationalism out there. Here's what you need to know about nutritional studies. There are two main types of nutritional study: epidemiological and double-blind placebo controlled, and both have major limitations. Epidemiological studies are generally conducted on thousands of people, over long periods of time, and involve food surveys. There are so many problems with this type of study it's comical. These studies do have some use, but it's very limited. -First, this type of study can never prove that one thing causes another. It can only show that two things are correlated. For example, increased ice cream consumption and shark attacks are highly correlated, but one does not cause the other. The thing they have in common is the summer months. So, when a study says meat will kill you ask yourself if meat is causing the adverse outcomes or is it correlated with negative outcomes. There's a gigantic difference. -These studies rely on people remembering what they ate anywhere from 6 months ago to the past 5 years. Do you remember what you ate a month ago? Exactly. These surveys are notoriously prone to error because of the difficulty of food recall. -Healthy and unhealthy user basis. People who are healthy tend to say that why engage in more healthy activities on their survey, whether they do or not. Unhealthy people tend to say that they engage in more unhealthy activities, whether they do or not. This clouds the results. Any time you see a study that says it involved more than a 1000 people that's generally a dead ringer for an epidemiological study, and the best that study can show is that two things are correlated not that they cause each other. Always be skeptical of the claims of these studies. Again, all they can show is that two things are correlated not that one caused the other. The other type of study, namely the randomized-controlled double blind placebo study is the gold standard of research. However, it's really hard to do when it comes to food (as opposed to pills) because most people don't want live in a metabolic ward for 6 months and eat the same thing. These studies tend to have way fewer people like 50-200 and they're generally shorter because it takes a lot of money and time to run them. These studies can establish causation, but they're very hard to do in terms of recruiting people, funding them, and doing them over the proper length of time. Does this mean we can't learn anything from nutritional studies? No. But we need to be crystal clear on what these things can show and what they can't show and we need to avoid falling for the sensationalistic media hype that blows the results of studies completely out of proportion. So, the next time you hear that beef will kill you or eggs are the devil, please view those claims with the appropriate level of skepticism and see what the data is to back up those claims.
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What do CFSB Coaches Eat?-Carl’s Story

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In this interview we sit down with Coach Carl. For those of you who don't know Carl here are a few facts about him. -He is co-owner of CrossFit South Bend -He is our head Strength and Conditioning Coach. -He runs all our high school/college athlete programs -He is a former Rugby athlete and current Rugby coach -He is on staff with Power Athlete HQ (If you don't know what that is, check it out. It is one of the top Strength and Conditioning programs out there) -(As of the time of this posting) He just got married to his wife Emily. In this video Carl tells us: -What eating was like for him growing up -His personal evolution when it comes to healthy eating -What he currently eats on a daily basis with concrete examples -What he's learned from years of being a Rugby athlete and coach -What his favorite off-plan foods are -His favorite special occasions to eat off-plan food.
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Should everyone have the same diet?

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Should everyone have the same diet? Yes (and no) This is actually going to be a two part series. In this video I'll make the case that there is a solid general foundational diet that everyone should be eating from a health perspective, namely real whole food. In the second video I'll explain where there can be legitimate variation on this base foundational diet of real whole food. What's the base foundational diet that everyone should be eating? Real whole food. What's real whole food? Quality protein, vegetables, healthy fats, fruits, nuts and seeds, herbs and spices. Why should they be eating this way? From a historical perspective, it's just an objective fact that while different cultures have eaten things at different places and times they all were eating 100% real whole food. -They were all eating some animal protein -They were all eating some plant material -They were all eating some healthy fat -Also, none of them were eating Cheetos, pizza, or soda. Forget history for a second, let's just look at the nutrient contents of foods. From a nutritional perspective, it's just an objective fact, from a health perspective, that certain foods have more nutrients than others. If you compared all foods based on their content of things like Vitamin A, iron, zinc omega-3s,etc. the winners in every single category would be things like: -Animal protein (especially organ meats, like liver, and seafood). -Vegetables (not legumes, not grains, but vegetables) -Not a single solitary Cheerio, Cheeto or Pepsi would even come close to making the list. From a macronutrient perspective, it's just an objective fact, from a health perspective, that there are certain things that are true about humans. We're not pure carnivores like wolves, but we're also not pure herbivores like cows. -We're omnivores and as such we need some protein, some veggies, and some healthy fat, not just only one of those three things. So, while there are definitely a number of differences in what people ate across cultures and times there is 100% an objective fact of the matter about a foundational human diet for human beings that is based on real whole food, nutrient-dense foods, and a balance of protein, carbs and fat. In the next video we'll discuss where legitimate variation can come in. __________________________________________________________________________ Today we are going to talk about the following question, should everyone eat the same things? Should everyone have the same diet, or the same nutrition protocol? This is actually going to be a two part video, in this video I'm actually going to argue that people should be eating roughly the same thing, from a health perspective. You'll see what I mean by that, it ends up being very broad. In the second video I'm going to argue that people actually should eat very differently. So, you might be wondering am I just really contradicting myself? Well you'll see, hopefully, that I'm not contradicting myself. Rather, what I'm trying to argue for I that from a broad and general perspective there is an objective fact of the matter about what human beings should eat, and what nourishes us. That being said, from that basic objective foundation there's a tremendous amount of variation in which human beings can both survive, and thrive. That's what I'll talk about more in on the second video. In this video let's talk about whether human beings should basically eat the same thing? Again, we're talking from a health perspective, no a religious perspective, or an ecological perspective, or financial perspective. Those are all interesting in different perspectives, but we're talking about from a health perspective. Sometimes you'll hear the claim made, well you know these people in this culture they eat that. Those people in that culture they something entirely different, therefore there is no one universal human diet. Well to a certain extent that's certainly true. That's one of the ideas of variability that I'll talk about in the second video. But truth be told if you look at pretty much all traditional cultures, all of the blue zones on earth, these super longevity sites where people are people are living 100 plus years. If you look historically at hunter gathers, there is an objective fact of the matter about generally speaking what they're eating. Generally speaking what they're eating is the thing we've been advocating for in all of our videos. Namely real whole food. Food that you could grow or hunt. Food that you can cook. Food that does not come in a bag, a box, a package, or a bar, or something like that. These traditional cultures were not eating highly processed seed oils. They were not eating Cheetos. They were not eating pizza. They were not eating cookies. Generally speaking, every single one of them has some kind of animal protein in there in some quantity. They have tons, and tons, and tons of vegetables. They have lots of fiber. They have traditional, and healthy fats. Now you can run this all the way to different extremes, right? The Inuit have this super high protein, high fat diet from a sort of seal, and whale blubber. Then on the other side you have The Catawbas who have a super high carbohydrate diet of different starchy tubers, and things like that. But at the end of the day what they're all eating is real whole food. The macronutrients might differ, and the micronutrients might differ, but those things are the same. From, kind of, a historical perspective there is an objective fact of the matter that we are all eating real whole food. Don't even worry about the historical perspective for a second, let's worry about micronutrients. There is an objective fact of the matter about what micronutrients humans need. We need certain micronutrients, like vitamins A, D, E, K, C, all the B vitamins. We need certain minerals, like potassium, magnesium, zinc, and iron. There's certain things that we can't synthesize that other animals can. Vitamin C for example, we can't synthesize that on our own, so we need to get it from the diet. We need certain omega 3 fats. Again, when you look at that entire list, all the vitamins, all the minerals, the phytochemicals, the omega 3's, and you look at the top foods that have those things, guess what? It's all real whole food. It's meats, veggies, healthy fats, fruits, nuts and seeds, earthen spices. You're not going to see Pepsi at the top of that list. You're not going to see a candy bar at the top of that list. You're not going to see any of those types of things. You're not going to see canola oil at the top of the vitamin A list, or the manganese list, or even anywhere on the list. So, when it comes to micronutrients as well there is an objective fact of the matter about the fact that we, generally speaking, need real whole food for the purpose of health. If you look at it from a macronutrients perspective ... Micronutrients are those vitamins, and minerals, and omega 3 fatty acid. If you look at it from a macronutrients perspective in terms of proteins, and carbohydrates, and fats there's a certain objective fact of the matter about our human biochemistry that necessitates eating a number of different things. Now of course there have been multiple different cultures that have survived on different balances of these things, but we all need some of these three different things. We are not obligated carnivores. Say like a wolf, or something like that, where they can utilize all that dietary protein for different needs in their boy. We're not pure herbivores either, like a cow. Where they have two stomachs, and can convert plant matter into all the necessary things they need. We need some protein, and typically we need some of that protein, all though not all of it, to come from animal sources. To rebuild muscle tissue. For hormone production. For neurotransmitter production. For all sorts of different things. We need some carbohydrate, the brains preferred fuel is glucose. We need some of that for our body to function. We need some of that for high intensity activities. We can't store very much of it, but we need some of it for high intensity activities. Then we 100% need healthy fats in there as well. The number one energy source for the vast majority of what you do on a daily basis comes from your fat in take. Actually you know, that's what your body should be using to fuel the vast majority of what you do. So, we need some proteins, some carbohydrates, and some healthy fats. We can not survive on carbs alone. We can not survive on protein alone. Fats really the one we could come closest to, but even that gets a little bit hairy. So, both to survive and thrive, there is an objective fact of the matter about the fact that we need this real whole food as a baseline to survive. When people say that they're in different cultures, that they're eating different things, and therefore there's no one true human diet. Well to a certain extent that's true, but it depends on what you mean. When we're talking about the broad outlines of what everyone should be eating for health the answer is real whole food. Meats, fish, eggs, seafood, veggies, healthy fats, fruits, nuts and seeds, herbs and spices, things of that nature. From a health perspective we do objectively need those things. But within that there can be a whole ton of variation. In the next video I'll talk about that variation. All right guys, thanks so much for turning in. See you next time.