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CFSB Nutrition-Muscle Gain Program

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In this video we talk about all the details of our CFSB Nutrition Muscle Gain Program where the main goals are to be strong, huge, and swole. -At a fundamental level in order to gain muscle size and strength you’ll need to consume MORE calories than you burn. With your individualized program, we’ll -Determine a realistic and sustainable time-frame to gain the muscle mass/strength you want -We’ll still focus on food quality and health so that you can gain muscle mass/strength in a healthy way (without resorting to processed foods) -We’ll craft your program so you can gain as much muscle mass/strength as possible while minimizing any increase in body fat mass. -Healthy sustainable muscle mass gain is roughly between 1-4lbs a month. Just a reminder that this program can be done remotely and you don't need to be a CrossFit South Bend member to do the program. You can book a free goal session with the following link to get started with the program.   https://crossfitsouthbend.as.me/?appointmentType=928667
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CFSB Nutrition-Athletic Performance Program

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In this video we talk about our new CFSB Nutrition Athletic Performance Program. What's the central goal of this program? Athletic Performance. How do we measure that? It depends on your sport/athletic activity, but usually with things like: -More points scored -Jumping higher -Running faster -Lifting more -Doing your workout faster What are the two most important nutritional aspects to keep in mind when trying to achieve these goals #1 Eating enough calories. This is HUGE, and I see far too many people under-eating who want to perform. You need to eat enough to perform well. #2 Getting the right macro split for your sport/athletic activity. Even if you're eating an appropriate amount of calories, if you're a power lifter eating 400g a day of carbs and 100g a day of protein, we need to switch up those macros ASAP. Vice versa, if you're trying to be a competitive CrossFit, MMA, or BJJ athlete and you're eating 50g of carbs a day we'll probably need switch that up to a higher carb intake. Looking to optimize your nutrition for athletic performance? Feel free to DM/email us and we'll get in contact with you about setting up a free 30min goal consultation.
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CFSB Nutrition-Fat Loss Program

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In this video we talk about all the details of our CFSB Nutrition Fat Loss Program. This program is for people who want to be lean and toned. -At a fundamental level in order to lose weight, assuming there are no underlying health issues, you’ll need to consume FEWER calories than you burn. With your individualized program, we’ll -Determine a realistic/sustainable time-frame to lose the body fat you want -Focus on food quality and health so that you can lose body fat without sacrificing energy levels, recovery in the gym, sleep quality, etc. -Craft your program so you can maintain as much muscle mass as possible while still losing body fat -Healthy sustainable fat loss is roughly between 4-8lbs a month. Just a reminder that this program can be done remotely and you don't need to be a CrossFit South Bend member to do it.
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NEW Fat Loss, Muscle Gain, and Athletic Performance Programs!

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We're excited to officially announce the launch of our new CFSB Nutrition Fat Loss, Muscle Gain, and Athletic Performance Programs! In this video we discuss the main differences between our normal one-on-one nutrition coaching program and these new programs. -While our regular nutrition program focuses mainly on overall health, these programs focus primarily on fat loss, muscle gain, or athletic performance. We still take health into consideration with these new programs, but that takes second place to body composition and athletic performance. -In our regular nutrition coaching program we focus primarily on food quality and real whole food (i.e., quality protein, veggies, and healthy fats) while food quantity is a secondary concern. With these new programs for body composition and athletic performance food quantity is of primary importance. We need to know how many calories, grams of protein, grams of carbs, grams of fat, etc. you're consuming in order to achieve optimal fat loss, muscle gain or athletic performance. -In our regular nutrition coaching program we don't require tracking things like calories, carbs, etc., but with these programs it's a requirement of the program that someone track their food for the entire duration of the program in order to achieve optimal fat loss, muscle gain or athletic performance -Our normal nutrition coaching program is mainly for beginners who need the basics like knowing how to grocery shop, deal with cravings, and make healthy meals. However, these new programs are for people who are intermediate or advanced when it comes to their knowledge and implementation of healthy nutrition. -In our normal nutrition coaching program we place less emphasis on scales for weighing, both food scales and regular bodyweight scales. However, with these new programs it's essential that someone is weighing and measuring their food, and that they are weighing measuring themselves on a fairly regular basis to maintain progress. Interested in new these programs or our regular nutrition coaching programs you can schedule a free 30min consultation either remotely or in-person with the following link. https://crossfitsouthbend.as.me/initialnutritionconsultation
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How to achieve food freedom with nutrition coaching

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In this video we talk about how a nutrition coach can help you achieve food freedom. What's food freedom? Where you are in control of food, not the other way around. When you have food freedom, -You're no longer searching for the next fix of sugar. -You no longer feel compelled to have unhealthy foods just because others are having them. -You get to choose which foods are worth it to you and which foods are not. How can nutrition coaching help you achieve food freedom? Through things like -A special occasion calendar: this helps you figure out when it's appropriate to have chocolate chip cookies (for example). Grandma's homemade cookies at Thanksgiving are appropriate while scarfing down a bag of Chips-a-hoy on Tuesday evening because you're stressed from work is not. -A special foods list-some foods are really worth having and others aren't. An artisanal pizza that you're enjoying while traveling to Italy is incredibly different from a personal pan pizza from Pizza Hut. If you're going to have off plan food it's important to make sure it's worth it and good quality. -Food elimination and reintroduction : during our program we cut out commonly problematic foods like sugar, wine, dark chocolate, etc. However, we then reintroduce them after a period of time (typically 30 days) to see how you do them. This allows you to create your own food freedom around foods that are worth it and foods that aren't. Interested in giving nutrition coaching a try? You can set up a free 30min meeting with CFSB Nutrition head coach Robby Gustin with the link below. https://crossfitsouthbend.as.me/initialnutritionconsultation
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What do CFSB Coaches Eat?-Kate’s Story

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In this interview we sit down with Coach Kate to talk about what she eats on a regular basis. For those of you who don't know Coach Kate, she: -is a licensed therapist -is a mom of three -is a long time CrossFitter -was my very first one-on-one nutrition coaching client a number of years back -is a badass when it comes to cardio/endurance workouts In this video Kate tells us: -What eating was like for her growing up -Her personal evolution when it comes to healthy eating -What she currently eats on a daily basis with concrete examples -What she's learned about healthy eating given all the different commitments in her life -What her favorite off-plan foods are -Her favorite special occasions to eat off-plan food.
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How many carbs should you eat per day?

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One of the most frequent questions I get asked is: how many carbs should I be eating per day? As with everything else we discuss, the answer is that it totally depends on your goals, health status, training level, etc. For example, a 300lb sedentary person will need fewer carbs than a 25 year old CrossFit athlete. That being said there are good general guidelines we can give as a starting point. For most active adults, who typically weigh between 100-200 lbs, a good amount of daily carbs is: 100-200 grams per day. A big difference between carbs and protein is that carb intake is, to a large extent, based on energy expenditure (i.e., how much you work out). This ranges from .5g/lb for sedentary individuals all the way up to 2g/lb for highly active individuals. Most adult humans weigh between 100 and 200lbs and 1.0g of carbs per pound of bodyweight for generally active individuals is a good place to start for most people. Whether you calculate this based on 1g/lb of weight based on a generally active individual or even based on 20-30% of total calories they're all roughly speaking going to come out fairly close to 100-200g per day for most active adults. How would this actually shake out in real life? Let's say you had someone who weighed 150lbs who does CrossFit 3-4 times a week. There are so many factors to take into consideration, but generally speaking this peson would be getting around 150g of carbs per day. This would be 50g of carbs per meal assuming 3 meals. In future videos, we'll talk about what kinds of carbs you should be eating, and special considerations to take into account weighing and measuring carbs.
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CFSB Nutrition-Ben and Amy’s Story

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In this video we sit down with Ben and Amy who did our three month one-on-one nutrition coaching program. What changed? -Amy got way more control over her food choices rather than food controlling her -Both of their energy levels were way better -Ben lost 30lbs and 13% body fat. -Ben got a couple strict pull-ups -Amy's body composition was already quite good when we started, but it got even better throughout the process. They tell us -what life was like before we started working together -how their 3 months of nutrition coaching went. -how their lives changed -how they navigated this program with jobs, kids, and other time commitments -how they plan to stick with the plan long-term. Congrats on all your progress Ben and Amy! You did a great job!
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What can a nutrition coach help you with?

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In this video we talk about what sort of goals a nutrition coach can help you achieve.
 
It really boils down to three main things. A nutrition coach can help you achieve optimal:
 
1) Health
2) Performance
3) Body Composition (lower body fat/more muscle)
 
Health:
-Here, we're talking about things like how do you feel, do you have enough energy throughout the day, do you wake up feeling tired, do you get the two p.m. slump, are you sleeping properly, are you recovering well from workouts, do you have cravings all the time?
 
-With proper health, we teach people how to eat nutrient dense real whole food that sustains them, that gives them proper blood sugar levels, that makes it so that they have fewer cravings so that they're getting properly fueled throughout the day and they're not kind of really energized and then crashing.
 
-We help people get the adequate nutrients they need to feel like the best version of themselves
 
What about performance?
- If someone's just looking to perform well at their sport it's really important for them to get adequate calorie amounts, adequate amounts of protein, carbs and fat but also food quality.
 
-You see it a ton in sports where people are like well, as long as I'm eating what I need to eat, it could be pizza and milk and other things, just tons of calories. Well, you're fueling your body but are you fueling your body right and are you recovering properly from workouts and are you minimizing inflammation and are you digesting things well?
 
- So we can help people by teaching them the proper foods that are gonna help nourish their body in addition to the proper amount of calories, protein, carbs and fat.
 
Body Composition:
-A lot of people are looking to lose weight and lose body fat, get lean, get a six pack or maybe get stronger and build muscle mass. As nutrition coaches, we can help people adjust their calorie intake to achieve either goal.
 
-If they're looking to get lean, we're obviously gonna probably take things down a bit. If they're looking to get strong and big, we're gonna build things up a little bit.
 
-With body composition, we can also adjust your macronutrients, things like your protein and carb and fat intake.
 
So a nutrition coach can help you with a lot of different things but I would say the three main things are your body composition, your health and your performance.
_________________________________________________________________________ Transcript - Hey, guys, Robby here from CFSB Nutrition at CrossFit South Bend. Today we're gonna talk about what sort of goals a nutrition coach can help you achieve. So in my view, it really boils down to three main ones. There are others as well but these are the three main ones, body composition, health and performance. So let's talk about each. So body composition. A lot of people are looking to lose weight and lose body fat, get lean, get a six pack or maybe get stronger and build muscle mass. As nutrition coaches, we can help people adjust their calorie intake to achieve either goal. If they're looking to get lean, we're obviously gonna probably take things down a bit. If they're looking to get strong and big, we're gonna build things up a little bit. With body composition, we can also adjust your macronutrients, things like your protein and carb and fat intake. What about health? Here, we're talking about things like how do you feel, do you have enough energy throughout the day, do you wake up feeling tired, do you get the two p.m. slump, are you sleeping properly, are you recovering well from workouts, do you have cravings all the time? With proper health, we teach people how to eat nutrient dense real whole food that sustains them, that gives them proper blood sugar levels, that makes it so that they have fewer cravings so that they're getting properly fueled throughout the day and they're not kind of really energized and then crashing. We could help people get the adequate nutrients they need to feel like the best version of themselves and then performance. If someone's just looking to perform well at their sport, boy, it's really important for them to get adequate calorie amounts, adequate amounts of protein, carbs and fat but also food quality. You see it a ton in sports where people are like well, as long as I'm eating what I need to eat, it could be pizza and milk and other things, just tons of calories, well, you're fueling your body but are you fueling your body right and are you recovering properly from workouts and are you minimizing inflammation and are you digesting things well? So we can help people by teaching them the proper foods that are gonna help nourish their body in addition to the proper amount of calories, protein, carbs and fat. So a nutrition coach can help you with a lot of different things but I would say the three main things are your body composition, your health and your performance. Alright, guys, hopefully now you've got a good sense of how that all works. Thanks so much for tuning in, we'll see ya next time.
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Weighing and Measuring Protein-Special Considerations

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In this video we talk about certain special considerations you should keep in mind when keeping track of your protein macros.
 
1. When calculating your macros/calories be sure to take account of the protein AND the fat from your quality protein sources.
 
While oils tend to be pure fat and most vegetables/plant foods are almost exclusively carbohydrate, most quality protein sources are a combo of protein AND fat. An exception would be something like a boneless skinless chicken breast which is almost exclusively protein.
 
For example, 8oz or half a pound of 85/15 ground beef would be roughly 42g of protein, 0g of carbs, 34g of fat. If you only accounted for the protein you would be missing a substantial amount of fat in your calorie/macro calculations.
 
2. Weigh and measure your protein sources RAW.
 
There's debate about this online and you're welcome to do it however you'd like. Generally speaking, though, the best way to go about things is to weigh and measure your protein raw because it shrinks
while cooking. Furthermore the nutrition facts on the label are for the RAW food not the cooked food.
 
For example, if you weight 8oz of 85/15 ground beef on a scale before you cooked it it should be 227g, but if you weighed it after cooking, depending on the cooking method, it would be as low as 150g by weight. There's a significant difference between entering 227g of ground beef in MyFitnessPal and 150g.
 
3. Grams of weight is NOT the same as grams of protein.
 
For example, when you put 8oz/half pound of ground beef on a scale it should weigh 227g. However, that is NOT the total amount of protein in the ground beef. 227g by WEIGHT of ground beef would yield roughly 100g of protein (depending on the leanness of the beef or other meat).
 
Hopefully these are useful tips for when you weigh and measure your protein.
___________________________________________________________________________TRANSCRIPT
- Now let's finish by talking about some special considerations.
Okay, so with a lot of foods that we'll be talking about, they are just typically one macronutrient, so I'll give you an example. So oils would typically just be healthy fat. Carbs, or excuse me, vegetables and fruit would typically just be carbohydrates. With the animal protein sources that you're consuming here, typically they are also gonna contain a decent amount of fat in them as well. And this balance is important. So take a couple examples on either end of the spectrum. Chicken breast would be an example of a super, super lean protein, so very high in protein, about 50 grams of protein for having half a pound or eight ounces. Super low in fats. So if you're doing more of a bodybuilding diet, or a leaner protein diet, that's going to be fantastic. Bacon on the other hand is gonna be the exact opposite, total reverse. And most pork in general, with the exception of pork tenderloin and pork chops, is gonna be much higher in fat and lower in protein. So bacon, not a great protein source. It's gonna have some, but it's gonna be mostly fat and not as much protein. So if someone's doing a ketogenic diet. Much higher fat, moderate protein, super low carb, then bacon's gonna be a really good option there. But you should remember that with these animal protein sources, it's gonna be mixed not just of protein, but also of fat, and we'll talk about this when we get to the macros video on fat as well.
Raw versus cooked. So you'll see a lot of debate and discussion online about this, and you're welcome to weigh and measure however you'd like, but if you're weighing and measuring in MyFitnessPal or something like that, I would advocate that you weight your stuff raw, or really the easiest way is look, you've got a pound of ground beef, you know and you're cooking it up, and you put half of that pound, let's say after it's cooked, on your plate, then you write just eight ounces in MyFitnessPal and that will calculate out the rough amount of protein you've consumed based on whether you're eating ground beef or chicken. The problem is that there's going to be a decent discrepancy between these two. So just to give you an example, if you cooked up a, let's just use a half pound for right now, let's say a half pound of 85/15 ground beef. By weight, that's gonna be 227 grams before you cook it. And then depending on the method you cook it, you know, I'll typically roast it in the oven, or saute it, that can come out anywhere around like 150 grams by weight. So we're talking a pretty significant difference there, in terms of what it's going to yield when you enter that into MyFitnessPal or some other program.
Which leads me to my final point, which is a very common source of confusion, grams versus grams, so this is a question I hear all the time about protein that people get very confused about that let's try to clear up. Let's take eight ounces, or half a pound of something. Eight ounces of protein, whether it's ground beef or chicken or what have you, would be roughly 227 grams by weight of that meat. So if you put that meat on the scale, it's going to say 227 grams, before you cook it typically. That's what it will weigh. Because a full pound is 454, so half that, 227. But that same eight ounces precooked is going to be 100 grams of protein. Why? Because, well for many reasons, but the main reason being that not all of that weight is made up of protein, some of it is made up of water, some of it's made up of fat, some of it's made of other things, so the weight of the protein is not the same as the total amount of grams of protein. Which brings me back to one other point that I should have made up here. A lot of times when you're looking on the back of raw meat, or even on a nutrition facts label, whether it be online or in MyFitnessPal, they're giving you the nutrition facts data for raw, not cooked. Sometimes you can find cooked, but generally it's raw. So that's one of the other reasons why it's important to weigh and measure things typically raw. Alright guys, so we covered how much protein you should be having per day, what kind it should come from, and some special considerations to take into account. Hopefully now, if you're looking to make macros a part of the way that you get a sense of what to do with your food, you have a sense of how to go about doing this now, especially with protein. In future videos we will cover carbs and fat. Alright guys, thanks so much for tuning in, see you next time.