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What do CFSB Coaches Eat?-Kate’s Story

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In this interview we sit down with Coach Kate to talk about what she eats on a regular basis. For those of you who don't know Coach Kate, she: -is a licensed therapist -is a mom of three -is a long time CrossFitter -was my very first one-on-one nutrition coaching client a number of years back -is a badass when it comes to cardio/endurance workouts In this video Kate tells us: -What eating was like for her growing up -Her personal evolution when it comes to healthy eating -What she currently eats on a daily basis with concrete examples -What she's learned about healthy eating given all the different commitments in her life -What her favorite off-plan foods are -Her favorite special occasions to eat off-plan food.
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How many carbs should you eat per day?

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One of the most frequent questions I get asked is: how many carbs should I be eating per day? As with everything else we discuss, the answer is that it totally depends on your goals, health status, training level, etc. For example, a 300lb sedentary person will need fewer carbs than a 25 year old CrossFit athlete. That being said there are good general guidelines we can give as a starting point. For most active adults, who typically weigh between 100-200 lbs, a good amount of daily carbs is: 100-200 grams per day. A big difference between carbs and protein is that carb intake is, to a large extent, based on energy expenditure (i.e., how much you work out). This ranges from .5g/lb for sedentary individuals all the way up to 2g/lb for highly active individuals. Most adult humans weigh between 100 and 200lbs and 1.0g of carbs per pound of bodyweight for generally active individuals is a good place to start for most people. Whether you calculate this based on 1g/lb of weight based on a generally active individual or even based on 20-30% of total calories they're all roughly speaking going to come out fairly close to 100-200g per day for most active adults. How would this actually shake out in real life? Let's say you had someone who weighed 150lbs who does CrossFit 3-4 times a week. There are so many factors to take into consideration, but generally speaking this peson would be getting around 150g of carbs per day. This would be 50g of carbs per meal assuming 3 meals. In future videos, we'll talk about what kinds of carbs you should be eating, and special considerations to take into account weighing and measuring carbs.
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CFSB Nutrition-Ben and Amy’s Story

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In this video we sit down with Ben and Amy who did our three month one-on-one nutrition coaching program. What changed? -Amy got way more control over her food choices rather than food controlling her -Both of their energy levels were way better -Ben lost 30lbs and 13% body fat. -Ben got a couple strict pull-ups -Amy's body composition was already quite good when we started, but it got even better throughout the process. They tell us -what life was like before we started working together -how their 3 months of nutrition coaching went. -how their lives changed -how they navigated this program with jobs, kids, and other time commitments -how they plan to stick with the plan long-term. Congrats on all your progress Ben and Amy! You did a great job!
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What can a nutrition coach help you with?

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In this video we talk about what sort of goals a nutrition coach can help you achieve.
 
It really boils down to three main things. A nutrition coach can help you achieve optimal:
 
1) Health
2) Performance
3) Body Composition (lower body fat/more muscle)
 
Health:
-Here, we're talking about things like how do you feel, do you have enough energy throughout the day, do you wake up feeling tired, do you get the two p.m. slump, are you sleeping properly, are you recovering well from workouts, do you have cravings all the time?
 
-With proper health, we teach people how to eat nutrient dense real whole food that sustains them, that gives them proper blood sugar levels, that makes it so that they have fewer cravings so that they're getting properly fueled throughout the day and they're not kind of really energized and then crashing.
 
-We help people get the adequate nutrients they need to feel like the best version of themselves
 
What about performance?
- If someone's just looking to perform well at their sport it's really important for them to get adequate calorie amounts, adequate amounts of protein, carbs and fat but also food quality.
 
-You see it a ton in sports where people are like well, as long as I'm eating what I need to eat, it could be pizza and milk and other things, just tons of calories. Well, you're fueling your body but are you fueling your body right and are you recovering properly from workouts and are you minimizing inflammation and are you digesting things well?
 
- So we can help people by teaching them the proper foods that are gonna help nourish their body in addition to the proper amount of calories, protein, carbs and fat.
 
Body Composition:
-A lot of people are looking to lose weight and lose body fat, get lean, get a six pack or maybe get stronger and build muscle mass. As nutrition coaches, we can help people adjust their calorie intake to achieve either goal.
 
-If they're looking to get lean, we're obviously gonna probably take things down a bit. If they're looking to get strong and big, we're gonna build things up a little bit.
 
-With body composition, we can also adjust your macronutrients, things like your protein and carb and fat intake.
 
So a nutrition coach can help you with a lot of different things but I would say the three main things are your body composition, your health and your performance.
_________________________________________________________________________ Transcript - Hey, guys, Robby here from CFSB Nutrition at CrossFit South Bend. Today we're gonna talk about what sort of goals a nutrition coach can help you achieve. So in my view, it really boils down to three main ones. There are others as well but these are the three main ones, body composition, health and performance. So let's talk about each. So body composition. A lot of people are looking to lose weight and lose body fat, get lean, get a six pack or maybe get stronger and build muscle mass. As nutrition coaches, we can help people adjust their calorie intake to achieve either goal. If they're looking to get lean, we're obviously gonna probably take things down a bit. If they're looking to get strong and big, we're gonna build things up a little bit. With body composition, we can also adjust your macronutrients, things like your protein and carb and fat intake. What about health? Here, we're talking about things like how do you feel, do you have enough energy throughout the day, do you wake up feeling tired, do you get the two p.m. slump, are you sleeping properly, are you recovering well from workouts, do you have cravings all the time? With proper health, we teach people how to eat nutrient dense real whole food that sustains them, that gives them proper blood sugar levels, that makes it so that they have fewer cravings so that they're getting properly fueled throughout the day and they're not kind of really energized and then crashing. We could help people get the adequate nutrients they need to feel like the best version of themselves and then performance. If someone's just looking to perform well at their sport, boy, it's really important for them to get adequate calorie amounts, adequate amounts of protein, carbs and fat but also food quality. You see it a ton in sports where people are like well, as long as I'm eating what I need to eat, it could be pizza and milk and other things, just tons of calories, well, you're fueling your body but are you fueling your body right and are you recovering properly from workouts and are you minimizing inflammation and are you digesting things well? So we can help people by teaching them the proper foods that are gonna help nourish their body in addition to the proper amount of calories, protein, carbs and fat. So a nutrition coach can help you with a lot of different things but I would say the three main things are your body composition, your health and your performance. Alright, guys, hopefully now you've got a good sense of how that all works. Thanks so much for tuning in, we'll see ya next time.
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Weighing and Measuring Protein-Special Considerations

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In this video we talk about certain special considerations you should keep in mind when keeping track of your protein macros.
 
1. When calculating your macros/calories be sure to take account of the protein AND the fat from your quality protein sources.
 
While oils tend to be pure fat and most vegetables/plant foods are almost exclusively carbohydrate, most quality protein sources are a combo of protein AND fat. An exception would be something like a boneless skinless chicken breast which is almost exclusively protein.
 
For example, 8oz or half a pound of 85/15 ground beef would be roughly 42g of protein, 0g of carbs, 34g of fat. If you only accounted for the protein you would be missing a substantial amount of fat in your calorie/macro calculations.
 
2. Weigh and measure your protein sources RAW.
 
There's debate about this online and you're welcome to do it however you'd like. Generally speaking, though, the best way to go about things is to weigh and measure your protein raw because it shrinks
while cooking. Furthermore the nutrition facts on the label are for the RAW food not the cooked food.
 
For example, if you weight 8oz of 85/15 ground beef on a scale before you cooked it it should be 227g, but if you weighed it after cooking, depending on the cooking method, it would be as low as 150g by weight. There's a significant difference between entering 227g of ground beef in MyFitnessPal and 150g.
 
3. Grams of weight is NOT the same as grams of protein.
 
For example, when you put 8oz/half pound of ground beef on a scale it should weigh 227g. However, that is NOT the total amount of protein in the ground beef. 227g by WEIGHT of ground beef would yield roughly 100g of protein (depending on the leanness of the beef or other meat).
 
Hopefully these are useful tips for when you weigh and measure your protein.
___________________________________________________________________________TRANSCRIPT
- Now let's finish by talking about some special considerations.
Okay, so with a lot of foods that we'll be talking about, they are just typically one macronutrient, so I'll give you an example. So oils would typically just be healthy fat. Carbs, or excuse me, vegetables and fruit would typically just be carbohydrates. With the animal protein sources that you're consuming here, typically they are also gonna contain a decent amount of fat in them as well. And this balance is important. So take a couple examples on either end of the spectrum. Chicken breast would be an example of a super, super lean protein, so very high in protein, about 50 grams of protein for having half a pound or eight ounces. Super low in fats. So if you're doing more of a bodybuilding diet, or a leaner protein diet, that's going to be fantastic. Bacon on the other hand is gonna be the exact opposite, total reverse. And most pork in general, with the exception of pork tenderloin and pork chops, is gonna be much higher in fat and lower in protein. So bacon, not a great protein source. It's gonna have some, but it's gonna be mostly fat and not as much protein. So if someone's doing a ketogenic diet. Much higher fat, moderate protein, super low carb, then bacon's gonna be a really good option there. But you should remember that with these animal protein sources, it's gonna be mixed not just of protein, but also of fat, and we'll talk about this when we get to the macros video on fat as well.
Raw versus cooked. So you'll see a lot of debate and discussion online about this, and you're welcome to weigh and measure however you'd like, but if you're weighing and measuring in MyFitnessPal or something like that, I would advocate that you weight your stuff raw, or really the easiest way is look, you've got a pound of ground beef, you know and you're cooking it up, and you put half of that pound, let's say after it's cooked, on your plate, then you write just eight ounces in MyFitnessPal and that will calculate out the rough amount of protein you've consumed based on whether you're eating ground beef or chicken. The problem is that there's going to be a decent discrepancy between these two. So just to give you an example, if you cooked up a, let's just use a half pound for right now, let's say a half pound of 85/15 ground beef. By weight, that's gonna be 227 grams before you cook it. And then depending on the method you cook it, you know, I'll typically roast it in the oven, or saute it, that can come out anywhere around like 150 grams by weight. So we're talking a pretty significant difference there, in terms of what it's going to yield when you enter that into MyFitnessPal or some other program.
Which leads me to my final point, which is a very common source of confusion, grams versus grams, so this is a question I hear all the time about protein that people get very confused about that let's try to clear up. Let's take eight ounces, or half a pound of something. Eight ounces of protein, whether it's ground beef or chicken or what have you, would be roughly 227 grams by weight of that meat. So if you put that meat on the scale, it's going to say 227 grams, before you cook it typically. That's what it will weigh. Because a full pound is 454, so half that, 227. But that same eight ounces precooked is going to be 100 grams of protein. Why? Because, well for many reasons, but the main reason being that not all of that weight is made up of protein, some of it is made up of water, some of it's made up of fat, some of it's made of other things, so the weight of the protein is not the same as the total amount of grams of protein. Which brings me back to one other point that I should have made up here. A lot of times when you're looking on the back of raw meat, or even on a nutrition facts label, whether it be online or in MyFitnessPal, they're giving you the nutrition facts data for raw, not cooked. Sometimes you can find cooked, but generally it's raw. So that's one of the other reasons why it's important to weigh and measure things typically raw. Alright guys, so we covered how much protein you should be having per day, what kind it should come from, and some special considerations to take into account. Hopefully now, if you're looking to make macros a part of the way that you get a sense of what to do with your food, you have a sense of how to go about doing this now, especially with protein. In future videos we will cover carbs and fat. Alright guys, thanks so much for tuning in, see you next time.
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CFSB Nutrition-Brittany’s Story

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In this video we sit down with Brittany who completed our CFSB Nutrition one-on-one nutrition coaching program. Brittany is a mom of three, and her job as a nurse has unique hours. So, she was concerned about how she could fit healthy eating into her life. Not only was she able to fit healthy eating into her life, she thrived while doing it! During the program Brittany: -Lost 15lbs -Lost 3 inches off her waist -Lost 2 inches off her hips Even more importantly she had a lot of non-scale victories: -She is more in control of her food choices -Her husband and her entire family are generally eating healthier -She found ways to fit healthy eating into her busy schedule Brittany, we're so proud of you and your progress! Keep up the great work! ___________________________________________________________________________Transcript - Hey guys Robby here from CFSB Nutrition at Crossfit South Bend. Today I'm here with Brittany who just finished three months of nutrition coaching. Brittany, thank you so much for joining us today. So Brittany just lost 16 pounds. She lost three inches off her waist and two inches off her hips and I think we can both agree that the pictures are pretty night and day. You can see a big difference. - Absolutely, yeah. - So Brittany, tell us a little bit about what life was like before you started nutrition coaching. - So we have three small children at home. We have a really busy lifestyle running to soccer practices and gymnastics and just kind of all over the place. So just busy lifestyle, on the go. Not that we ate a lot of fast food because we do have a daughter with allergies but we didn't eat quality food. And we just ate what was quick, what was packaged thinking that there's no way we could do anything differently. Until I hit probably, I would say the lowest or I should say the highest my weight has been since giving birth. And I knew something had to change. I knew that even though we weren't doing fast food a lot that we still weren't eating quality food and we still weren't eating the way we should be. - So tell us a little bit about what you thought about this way of eating that I was describing was gonna be like before you started. So we sat down, we chatted about it. Were you nervous? Did you think it would be okay? Like what did you think before you gave it a shot? - So I was nervous because of how busy we are. And although my husband and I both like to cook, we definitely like our sweets and we like our pizzas and our Friday nights. So I was nervous about that. I was nervous about how much prep time and how much time I was gonna be in the kitchen and how that would take away from my children. And so I was a little bit nervous but yeah. - So after we actually got into the flow of things, tell people how did the reality match up to the expectations? So you were nervous going in. How did that actually manifest itself when you were actually doing the three months? - So my husband and I, the nice thing is he was 100 percent with me. He knew that we needed a change and he was there to support me. So the first couple of weeks, although yes there was, it does take a significant amount of planning especially when you're on the go and you do have small children. But it wasn't like I was spending hours in the kitchen or anything like that. I for the most part was able to prep and do things ahead of time after the kids would either go to bed or if my husband took over reading with the kids or doing homework so that I could prep for lunches and things the next day. I didn't feel like I was missing out on things. And there are quick and easy meals too. So it wasn't like you had a bajillion ingredients that nobody knew what they were. And we made it work just by shifting the way that we saw it a little bit or the way we did things just a little bit. And introducing foods slowly and taking out some slowly. - Excellent. So tell people about what it was like, so you've got a family, you got kids. You have a job that sometimes involves unique hours. How did you navigate that? - So like I said a lot of planning. It does take a lot of talking and looking ahead. There was a good video once about preparing for last minute changes and being a little bit flexible. So knowing that I needed to have extra veggies cut up in case we didn't get a little bit of time between gymnastics and soccer practice. Or if I had to go from I work at a school during the day and then I had to go to work at a hospital shift at night. Knowing that okay well I have to make sure that I take not only my lunch for the school but I have to take with me to the school my dinner for work. But we were really good about talking with that the night before or even a couple days out. And just making sure that A, we had groceries in the house. And B that our kids were taken care of and made sure that their food and everything was packed and then mine as well. So it did take a significant amount of planning and talking with my husband and working things out but definitely worth it. - Yeah once you put in the effort it sounds like it paid dividends. - Mm-hmm, it did. - One of the things we always like to talk about is the so-called non-scale victories. The things that go beyond the numbers and the pictures and the measurements. Tell people what non-scale victories you experienced during the program. - So for me eating was definitely pleasure. It was definitely comfort. Definitely had a foothold on me. And so part of this program and part of why I entered it was kind of to break some of those unhealthy habits. To feel empowered, to be able to say no, I don't really want that right now or things like that. So that when I went to a party and there was a whole bunch of things out that I wouldn't feel like I had to eat it or I didn't crave it. So I definitely have an empowerment over those unhealthy habits. Different foods that I can walk away from now. And it does make you just feel empowered and good about your choices. - Yeah, absolutely that's fantastic. - And definitely an example for my children as well. - Yeah, absolutely. The last question I always like to ask is imagine you were talking to someone who has a similar job or who's a mom or Brittany three or four months ago when she's not quite sure should I do this, should I not? What would you say to someone who is thinking about doing this after what you've experienced what you've experienced. - Well I would definitely be honest with them that yes it does take prep. It does take talking about what's going to go on during the week. But that it's not impossible and that it's not crazy hard. It just takes planning. It just takes looking at what the week holds and saying okay, so when do I get my groceries? And how can I get my veggies cut up? And just looking at it and planning ahead. But it really isn't as scary or daunting as it seems. And if you have the support at home, just knowing that you're in it together and you can do this. - Yeah, absolutely. Well I have to say on my end I'm super proud of you and all the progress you made. I think you did a fantastic job. Yeah, and I wish you guys continued success in the future with eating this way. - Well great, thank you. - Alright guys well thank you so much for tuning in and we'll see you next time.
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What do CFSB Coaches Eat?-Raleigh’s Story

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In this interview we sit down with Coach Raleigh to talk about his thoughts on healthy eating. For those of you don't know Raleigh, he is: -A USA Weightlifting certified coach -One of the head coaches of our Olympic Weightlifting program -a PhD student in the theology department at Notre Dame -a CFSB CrossFit coach In this video Raleigh tells us: -What eating was like for him growing up -His personal evolution when it comes to healthy eating -What he currently eats on a daily basis with concrete examples -What he's learned about healthy eating given all the different commitments in his life -What his favorite off-plan foods are -His favorite special occasions to eat off-plan food.
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CFSB Nutrition-Matt’s Story

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In this video we sit down with Matt to chat about his experience with our one-on-one nutrition coaching program. Matt's story is unique for a number of reasons. -He was already lean and fit when we started working together -He's a busy financial advisor who has to eat out at restaurants for work a lot -He was looking to improve his athletic performance, -He mainly wanted to learn the tools and develop the habits necessary to eat healthy long-term In the video Matt tells us about: -how he actually SAVED money eating real whole food despite people thinking eating healthy is expensive -how he gained more control over cravings and sugar swings with the program -how things like apples and 70% chocolate actually tasted super sweet after eliminating processed foods -how he learned the tools necessary to eat healthy for the rest of his life. We're super-proud of all your progress Matt! Keep up the great work! __________________________________________________________________________ Transcript: - Hey guys, Robby here from CSFB Nutrition at Crossfit South Bend, and today I am here with Matt who finished up a few months of nutrition coaching not too long ago. Matt, thank you so much for joining us. - Thanks for having me. - So, Matt tell us a little about what eating for you was like before we started working together. - Yeah, I ate just about anything that I saw. I didn't have a lot of discipline in what I was doing, I think that's really what kinda pushed me towards this is I knew that at certain point, you reach a stage in life where you can actually feel that that's not a healthy thing to be doing, but that's how I was all my life, I just ate whatever I wanted to in the moment and, you know, just start seeing the physical effects, so I mean you name it, Doritos were one of - Yeah. my weaknesses, I like sweets, you know, whatever it is, I just ate it. - So, in your mind, you know, you already, you know, you already were and you still are very lean and fit guy, but you had goals for performance. Tell us a bit about kind of what was the main impetus to start with this. - Yeah, well I think it was that thing you always tell yourself that you can still be the athlete you used to be, and just decided I was gonna try and start working out more, and just wasn't feeling the results, and I was talking with some of the coaches about it, it's like, I'm doing this, I'm doing this, I feel like I'm doing the right things but I'm not seeing results and somebody mentioned, you know, hey, have you looked at your diet, and I thought about it, and came and saw you, and yeah, that definitely was a big part of it. - So, tell us a bit about the journey, you know, month one we were kinda transitioning to the Whole30, then we did the Whole30, and then we after reintroduced, tell us about what that experience was like for you. - Oh, and remember with mine we had to delay it so we actually - Right, yeah. had the two month intro, so that took a long time, and I think at one point I just said I'm just ready to start this thing, I can't warm up anymore - Yeah, lets just do it. but it was, it was a big change trying to find, you know, ingredients that I just wasn't used to using. - Right. They weren't things I disliked it's just, you know we were talking about before it just takes the time to get those things together and prepare 'em, and make something happen, but that was a learning experience for me, but it was a good learning experience. - True, good. So, we were just talking about this earlier, you know, we might even do a video on it in the future, so you're a financial advisor over at Edward Jones. Tell people a little bit about, you know, what this was like cost wise, you know people have this persistent myth about food being, healthy food being super expensive, and cooking at home. What are your thoughts on that having experienced it? - Well, I think you can spend as much on the Whole30 as you wanna spend - Yeah. on it, and if you're gonna try and eat out a lot it's gonna rack up the bills, but I was surprised at how inexpensive it can be if you really want to. Simple ingredients, I mean you can get a bag of flash frozen vegetables for a dollar, you can get chicken breast for a, you know, reasonable price, and you can make a full meal that really fills you out of that, but yeah, I think that when people do say that it's too expensive, you gotta look at what they're actually spend their money on, - Right. cuz there are some great foods out there that aren't that expensive, but I think the difference is, it takes time, they're just not convenient foods necessarily. Now, if you wanna do Whole30 and you want it be convenient you're gonna spend a lot of money. You wanna take the time and do it right, you can do it for a reasonable price, no question. - Absolutely. So, one of the things we always like to talk about with people that Whole30 emphasizes this idea of like non-scale victories, so obviously you're at a good body composition to begin with, things changed positively for you, but you were already basically at a good place. Did you notice anything with sleep, or energy, or mood, or cravings, or performance at the gym, or anything like that? - Yeah, the biggest thing were the, it evened out a lot of the swings, you know the sugar swings where you're starving, you have that craving, you wanna grab something to, you know, fulfill that, and then, you know, an hour later you're looking at the fridge, you're looking into the pantry, that type of thing, so I definitely saw much more evening out of those, and didn't feel the drop, and that's what I didn't like, when you feel the drop, you just feel like, man I gotta get a pick me up, and amazing how things that I never would have thought as sweet, like an apple, tasted so sweet, first time afterwards I tried a 70% chocolate, - Yeah. and I thought this is gross it's so sweet, so I would say that was the biggest change for me, and it definitely saw some great results from it. A lot of things in your body that seem to waiver up and down, on the Whole30 they really were evened out quite a bit. - Awesome. So, the last thing we like to ask people is, you know, if you could talk to someone, you know, Matt a few months ago, or someone in a similar position, or you know, one of the things I remember we talked about was, you know, as part of your job you've got a lot of professional lunches, you know, talking to someone who is in a similar scenario, is like, can I do it, can I not? What would you say to someone who's maybe in a similar situation and isn't sure whether they could do something like this? - I mean there's no question, it's difficult, especially if you're on the go lunches, but for me it was really a questions of, and I talked to you about this early on, was the question do I wanna learn how to eat right going forward? - Right. The Whole30 is a temporary time. I think you can get through - Absolutely. 30 days of just about anything. - Yeah. - Can I sustain Whole30 for six months? Absolutely not. - Right, not me neither. But, at least now, what I've taken from this is a wonderful education that, you know, whether I'm, you know, doing a lunch with a wholesale, or something like that, I know which options on the menu are gonna make me feel better, and which ones are gonna make me feel worse. Where before, I just ate what I craved, and always felt bad afterwards, so I would say from that you can get a great education from this, and really help change your choices going forward, and it's worth it. - Yep, yep, absolutely. - 30 days of sacrifice and I get a lifetime education, that's a good deal. - Yeah, yeah, learning the right tools to actually sustain it going forward. Well, I gotta say on my end, I'm super proud of the progress you made, and the effort you put in, you did a fantastic job, and yeah, I appreciate you coming out to tell your story. - Well, I appreciate it and anybody watching this who's thinking about the coaching's just fantastic, and does a great job - Thank you. walking you through it. There's no way you can do it alone. If you can, hat's off but good coaching to through the program, so I appreciate it. - Yeah, thank you very much. Alright guys, thank you so much for tuning in. We'll see you next time.
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What do CFSB Coaches Eat?-Megan’s Story

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In this interview we sit down with Coach Megan to talk about her thoughts on healthy eating. For those of you don't know Megan she is: -currently a high school science teacher -a CrossFit coach -training to be a nutrtion coach -a mom of three In this video Megan tells us: -What eating was like for her growing up -Her personal evolution when it comes to healthy eating -What she currently eats on a daily basis with concrete examples -What she's learned about healthy eating given all the different commitments in her life -What her favorite off-plan foods are -Her favorite special occasions to eat off-plan food. _____________________________________________________________________ Transcript: - Hey guys, Robby here from CrossFit South Bend today I am here with coach Megan and she is going to be telling us about her life with food. So Megan, thank you so much for joining us today. - Thank you. - So first of all, Megan tell us what food was like for you growing up. - Huh, very traditional, cereals for breakfast. My parents both came from farmers. And so they kinda were raised on kinda real whole food initially. So we, although we had processed things like mac and cheese, ramen noodles, they were always like a big favorite as a kid, and cereals. My mom usually made dinner at night. She'd kind of throw together whatever veggies, meat, we'd have lots of butter and whole milk and stuff like that. But yeah, I think their background kind of lended itself. The problem was that is they also loved food and food was always around the table. So portion control and active lifestyle was not necessarily part of our life growing up. - Right, okay, so tell us about your journey through healthy eating. Like when you first started thinking about healthy eating to how you eat now and then we'll get to you know actually how you're eating at the moment. - Okay, so yeah because we always kind of had food and was always making food that was always part of my life. Always how I ate. High school, college, you go off and there's a lot of processed, a lot of convenience, and then got married and you kinda started playing with food, I realized I liked to cook. But there was still a lot of convenience, like Hamburger Helpers in the first couple years of marriage. And so you kind of didn't have, had an idea of what things sort of were healthy but not a real clear idea. And kids, time, fast forward to about three years ago, no? - Yeah, pretty much. - I got into the Whole 90, with you and then did food journaling for a year. And took a lot of I think what a background was and then was able just to change and tweak things. And so now it's very much real whole food, minimally processed stuff, trying to get the healthy fats, the quality protein, the veggies. So yeah, the last, I would say the last three years have been, I've felt really good and confident about my food. And it was not, it's nice because I didn't worry so much about weight. You know, that was always kind of a part of food. Like it was more like food was something I had to manipulate to be a certain way or to look a certain way or and so it's kind of been a nice shift for me within the last several years to I like my food and it doesn't, I know it fuels me and I'm not so worried about having to take something out or limit yeah. - So tell us a little bit about how you are eating now. Like what typical foods you might eat and then you know you brought some meals with you. - Yeah okay, I feel like I have to preface a little bit that I don't meal prep. I have the three kids, I have three kids, a 12 year old, a nine and a six year old. So I'm making dinner every night anyway. So most of our foods are dinners, I make large portions dinner. And then I will sometimes eat that for breakfast or I'll get it for sure for lunch, Mike and I take them for lunch. So, like I said dinners are usually. This is a good one to start with. So this is a pork steak that I don't know can you see, pork steak that we had one night, roast potatoes. We love roasting potatoes. I roast sweet potatoes, potato wedges, big, little potatoes, salt, pepper, whatever seasoning. And then we roast brussels sprouts, we'll roast broccoli, and then we'll kind of have this. Often we'll have, they're like a lettuce, grains, and have a small side salad on there. If you haven't seen my video on the buffalo chicken patties or you haven't checked out that recipe, this is my go to, and we're on the Whole 30 right now so this is like, I make it and I have it in the fridge always. And I put it over greens, and then it comes with like a mayo dressing on top so the fat it's super great. This was dinner last night, cauliflower rice with the teriyaki chicken. There's some chicken down under there and it had like zucchini and broccoli and carrots and onion and pineapple and all over cauliflower rice. So it's a lot of veggies, a lot of protein, I'm very liberal on my fat when I'm cooking. I like my fat a lot so, but it varies, so we have like soup, we love soup, we have soup once a week. It's just different every night. - Yeah. - So. - Those look delicious, very well presented, very easy. - Literally I threw them, like it's just leftovers from dinners this week so. - Yeah they look great. So I always in these videos like to talk about kind of unique aspects of someone's life, you know, Andrew was a college student, and you know, Carl's a rugby coach and all of these different things. So you are an anatomy and physiology teacher. You are a mom of three, you are a CrossFit coach, you are an athlete, you have all these different responsibilities and life things going on. Tell us how healthy eating fits into and relates to that and time constraints and kids and just anything you'd like to talk about with relation to that. - I very much have taken on, in all of this, it's very easy to become overwhelmed and want to like jump headfirst into everything. So as I was thinking back about things, I've taken on the approach of like put on my oxygen mask first. So that's really where it boils down to, is I've figured out what I needed to do for me to feel better personally, better in the gym. And so I made those changes for me and then Mike was like okay if you're making dinner I'll eat whatever you're making for dinner but I'm still gonna eat whatever over here. And then he's come on board, come a long way, just you know slowly, and now we're getting into the kids. So to help with that, like for me, I like to prep, not meal prep, but like I have to have a plan for the week. - Right. - So I make my menus, it's like my thing, if I don't know what I'm making that week, and I haven't gone and bougthen the things it's just, it all falls apart very quickly and it can get ugly. So I make my lists and then, and then we just you know I try to think about what's going on in my week and the easier meals to put together go on those busy nights and then the ones that take a little bit more time is those nights that I'm not coaching. You know, the insta pot is Tuesday, Thursday. Yeah, those are the nights that like I'm coaching, you know, going on. So a part of it, like really when it comes to food, a lot of it is convenience but to keep my family happy like I have to have something that is going to be taste good and that the kids are going to be interested in. If the kids aren't interested into it then life becomes difficult. So it's kind of this juggling like I make it to the quality that I want it to be I just try to search new recipes to fit the family. The time or the picky eaters, the little ones, so. - Good and you're doing a-- - Whole 30-ish, is that-- - Yeah, yeah. - Yeah, so this year was the first year at like, I said Mike kind of got on board and so this year I was like I'm gonna do a Whole 30 in February after my birthday. And so Mike has been eating really well with us and he's like I think we all should. Okay! So I wasn't quite there yet but the words came out of his mouth and then it was kind of like well let's try it, we'll see. So we are doing a Whole 30 with all three kids, ish. Now I would have to say there's certain tweaks that I've, like it's not perfect Whole 30 with kids but little things here or there that we'll let slide. Like I put some plantain chips in their lunch or something like that. But yeah the kids are on day 23, 24, something like that. So the real test is today when they come home with their Valentine's Day candy. - Right. - They know they're to put it in the cupboard and wait 'til next week but we'll see. But it's going really well, you know, the buy-in with the, we talked, prepped them a lot before, before doing a Whole 30. And then some of the buy-in was getting them to look at my recipe books and figure out what they might want to have for dinners. And so then we made the things they wanted for dinners. And sure enough a couple meals that they're like eh, lukewarm on. You know, every night they're like this was good, it was good and they haven't really bocked too much. They do like day dream about doughnuts and candy and bread 'cause you know I had taken cereal out of the house but breads, milk, sugar being the big things that they had to get rid of so. But yeah, it was, I thought I'll give it a week, we'll see how it goes and we're on week, three weeks now. - So-- - Wow. - Yeah. - That's fantastic. - For me it was a success whether it was-- - Yeah, that's huge I mean, yeah I mean to just do it you and Mike let alone you know the entire family I think, that's definitely an amazing accomplishment. - Thanks. Yeah now the tricky part is I have to figure out what I'm gonna, like where do we go after these 30 days. - Right. - So, we'll figure out that. - Cool, let's talk about nutritional off-roading. So as you know very well we typically like to talk about you know completely off planned foods in the context of special occasions. So tell me A about like special occasions that are meaningful to you in terms of food and then B like what are your favorite like, I don't care, I just want to have it. Whatever it is, it's like my favorite off plan food. - Oh, that's a good question. Special occasions, obviously the holidays. But even then I liked what Brandon talked about, you know like if I have to, if I really want it, like and where my willpower is in all of that. You know, I can have holidays and still be really good and say to the dessert. - Right. - There's a certain thing my mom's rolls at Christmas time like-- - Yeah. - Yeah, a lot of my special occasions tend to be I try to like save those for like our anniversary or date nights and usually they are to a special place that we like to go. Like our favorite like pizza is usually my thing. Or wine or something like that, but that, so those are my favorites. We have certain things like special occasions, like tailgates, oh we go camping every year. And like, actually, the last two years have pretty good though but, I don't know. It's hard because there's a context for everything just to say. - Right. - But pizza is a good one, burger, like a really good burger. And if it's baked goods like cake, I really like cake, that's my kind of, but I don't eat it all the time so like it's-- - Right, it's very infrequent. - Yeah. - Yeah. - Yeah, but those are my like-- - Go tos. - Go tos. - That's a good list, I like that list. - Yeah. - It's more me. Okay well, I think I'd like to end with the sense, you know you've already mentioned some great advice to people about you know, put your oxygen mask on first. Is there anything else, you'd like to share about your own personal journey through food or dealing with your family or any other nuggets of wisdom that you've encountered over the years that you'd like to share with others starting out maybe. - Yeah take care of yourself, that's a big one. Every once in awhile, I'll stop and I'll think about how far I've come, especially in my kitchen. I remember when I was first starting and looking at recipes and I'm like coconut amino what? And fish sauce huh? And you know all these things that seemed so foreign and my guess one of my biggest recommendations is to start little, like it doesn't have to be a huge transformation at first. It was, I took this one recipe and I tried the coconut aminos and I made this and I tweaked that and it worked out okay and then it was just little things along the way. So it doesn't have to be a complete 180 or life changing immediately. It was, I did a little bit that I could along the way. Like do your best until you know better and then you do better, you know that quote. And so I've just, okay well I'm gonna try this now and I'm gonna incorporate this. And so and there's no endpoint, like I'm still learning new things and I'm still trying new things. So I just, it's kind of a fun, it's just a constant experiment I think for me. And I just have fun kind of playing with it and learning more and trying more. I don't know, that'd probably be, yeah. - Cool, well thank you so much for being with us today, I appreciate it. - You're welcome. - All right guys, thanks so much for tuning and we'll see you next time.
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How much protein should you eat?

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One of the most frequent questions i get asked is: how much protein should I be eating? As with everything else we discuss, the answer is that it totally depends on your goals, health status, training level, etc. For example, a pregnant woman will need way less protein than a 21 year old male bodybuilder. That being said there are good general guidelines we can give as a starting point. For most active adults, who typically weigh between 100-200 lbs, a good amount of daily protein is: 100-200 grams per day. To make things simple and straight forward from a calculation perspective, someone weighing closer to 100lbs should be getting close to 100g of protein per day while someone weighing 200lbs should be getting close to 200g of protein a day. It's a bit more nuanced than this, and I would argue that for most people for health they only need about 1g/lb of lean body mass. But most people don't know their true lean body mass. So, using weight can be an easy, roughly correct, way to calculate it at home. Whether you calculate this based on 1g/lb of weight or 1g/lb of lean body mass or even based on 20-30% of total calories they're all roughly speaking going to come out fairly close to 100-200g per day for most active adults. What does this amount to in human food? An 8oz or half pound serving of most animal proteins (chicken, fish, beef, etc.) will be roughly 40-50g of protein. If it's leaner like chicken it will be closer to 50g of protein per serving. If it's more fatty it will be closer to 40g of protein per serving. So, to take an example, someone who weighs 150lbs would need roughly 150g of protein, which would be roughly 3x8oz servings of protein a day. In future videos, we'll talk about the differences between different types of protein, and special considerations to take into account weighing and measuring protein. ________________________________________________________________ Transcript: Today we are going to talk about protein. So on a previous video we did, a basic introduction to Macro Nutrients. So this is gonna be part of that series where, after giving the general review and introduction, were gonna talk more specifically, about each of the three macro nutrients. So, we're gonna talk about protein, and then eventually carbs and fat as well. And break 'em down, and make it easier for those of you, who want to start to play with your macros and, start manipulation those, in your nutrition and your diet. An easier way to do that. So, let's first talk about, since this is a, video concerning macros and amounts, let's talk about how much of these things, you should be having on a regular basis. So, I categorized the ranges into, a broad range and a narrow range. So, broadly speaking there's a super wide range, of amounts of protein you could eat. But that really becomes so broad because, on the one end, you know this, 0.36 grams per pound of body weight. That's basically the bare minimum, you need to avoid deficiencies. So for an adult male that'd be something like, 50 grams of protein a day, which is a comically small amount. And then on the upper end, technically speaking unless you have, some sort of health condition, there is no physiological upper limit, to the protein that you can consume. But you'd get pretty full pretty quickly, and it would crowd out other macro nutrients, like carbs and fats so, technically speaking, what physiologically you could consume, these insane quantities of protein, like 400, 500 grams. Technically speaking that's not gonna be, realistically feasible for most people. The other way I put it up here, is in terms of percent of calories. So, 15%, some you could potentially say as low as 10%. 15% of calories is for people who wanna maintain, a lower protein status. You'll see this a lot typically with pregnant women, where the body just sort of naturally says, to decrease protein consumption, from a health perspective, health, of the pregnancy. And then 40% of calories is really kinda the upper end, that you could go there, without starting to run into some potential issues, with balancing out other macro nutrients. The reason why I did a broad categorization of this, and a narrow categorization is that, the broad one gives you a sense of, really how far this range is. But the narrow one is much more realistic for most people. So look. For the vast majority of people, especially those watching this video. If you're doing CrossFit, if you're doing some workouts each week. Something like 100-200 grams of protein per day, is going to be a pretty good place for you to be. Now you'll hear all sorts of metrics out there, some people will say one gram per pound of body weight. Well, that would do pretty well, for people who are between 100 and 200 pounds, which again is the overwhelming majority of people. The overwhelming majority of adults. Some people will say one gram per pound of lean body mass, which is gonna be slightly, lower than, your totally body weight. So, say someone was 200 pounds, their lean body mass might be 160 pounds. So it would be one gram per 160 pounds. But generally speaking this is gonna be, a pretty good range for most of you. 100 being kinda on the lower end, depending on your size and your activity levels. 200 grams being on the upper end. But that's gonna do the vast majority of people, pretty well with what it is they're trying to do. Okay. Yes there's people like Thor the Mountain, from game of thrones who eats way in excess of this, but you are not Thor the Mountain, I am not Thor the Mountain. Most of us don't need you know, 10,000 calories a day, these super physiological doses. So, this is pretty good place for most people. What is that in percentage of calories, about 20% - 30%. That's gonna be a pretty good place. That's gonna help with things like, lean muscle maintenance, and building, fat loss, adequate replenishment of amino acid stores. Things like that. What does that break down to per meal? Well that's gonna be roughly something like. You know it's gonna depend on how many meals, but let's just talk about three to four meals a day, roughly. Four to eight ounces of, protein per meal. So let's say you're in the middle of this range, 150 grams. Eight ounces of protein is roughly 50 grams of protein. So if you have eight ounces of, chicken or ground beef or somethin' like that, that's roughly 50 grams of protein. If you have three eight ounce servings, that would be 150 grams of protein. If you're on the lower end of that spectrum, then somewhere between that, you know four to six range, again some people could maybe go as low as 75 here. But again just givin' you just sort of, a broad range of things, in terms of, how much you should be eating per meal. This is of course all gonna depend on, how many meals you have through-out the day. Some people may prefer to have, smaller more frequent meals, of smaller amounts of protein, rather than larger meals. So, hopefully that gives you a good sense, of how much protein you should be having.