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Walk MS 2019

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CFSB will be participating for the second year in Walk MS with CFSB Member's Brian and Demetria. Come out with us and show some support with Team Deme on Saturday May 4th - Registration begins at 8:00am and Walk starts at 9:00am Read on to hear Brian and Demetria's Story Brian and Demetria’s Story – Walk MS: South Bend 2019 My primary job in life is providing care for my wife, Demetria. In 2006, Demetria was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. MS is an unpredictable and disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain as well as between the brain and the body. MS is different for everyone, making it challenging to solve. Most people diagnosed with MS have the relapsing remitting form, meaning they experience “attacks” or increased neurological symptoms that last for several days to several months, followed by periods of “remissions” where they partially or completely recover from their symptoms. Demetria deals with a rarer form called primary progressive MS. It’s different in that there are no attacks or remissions, rather the decline of the central nervous system is slow and steady. Unfortunately, there are no medications to reverse the neurological damage. Medications only offer the potential to slow disease progression. Only a few years after her diagnosis, Demetria experienced a rapid and severe decline in her neurological system, developing very serious physical disabilities not typically associated with MS patients. By 2010, she developed a speech disorder, head tremors, severe muscle weakness in her legs, and ataxia in her arms. It’s been a very difficult journey, but we continue to fight her disease together and Demetria’s toughness and perseverance provides a great source of inspiration. But we are not without joy. Despite all of her challenges, Demetria gave birth to our son, Jude, in 2014! The love, energy, and enthusiasm that he displays every day reflects Demetria’s spirit. When I joined CFSB, it was to start “caring for the caregiver.” My experience has been amazing. While I’m proud of my improved fitness, my goal was always to find life balance and strengthen myself to continue my caregiving journey. I never expected to find such a truly positive and supportive community that would help me in achieving this unique goal. Last year, when we invited the coaches to Walk MS, we were hoping they would wear our orange Team Deme t-shirts during classes on the day of the walk to help raise awareness for MS. Instead, they asked us to share our story, closed the gym to join us at Walk MS, and encouraged everyone to join our team. The support we felt from the entire CFSB community was incredibly uplifting. Thank you to everyone that helped make it a memorable day and thank you to the members and coaches who continue to strengthen me and allow me to continue caring for Demetria. This year, we are once again participating in Walk MS: South Bend to recognize Demetria’s fight against multiple sclerosis. My wife and I wanted to invite all of CFSB to join “Team Deme” and participate in Walk MS: South Bend on Saturday, May 4th. Since 2014, Team Deme has raised almost $10,000 for the National MS Society (and with CFSB’s help, almost $4,700 last year)! The money raised helps the National MS Society fund research, advocate for change, and support programs for those impacted by MS – programs that my family has used to obtain home care, medication, and medical equipment. It makes a big difference in many lives. Please consider donating to our team and/or joining us on Saturday, May 4th for Walk MS: South Bend. You can use the following link to join our team, register for Walk MS, and get more information: http://main.nationalmssociety.org/goto/TeamDeme19 Finally, we always give orange t-shirts to those that join us at Walk MS. We are going to re-use the same t-shirt design as last year. If you are new to our team or need a new shirt for any reason, please let us know your t-shirt size by Monday, April 8th. Thanks so much to the entire CFSB community for your love and support!
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Where should you get your protein from?

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In this video we talk about where you should get your protein from.
 
There are three main sources that we discuss. Check out the video for all details.
 
Animal Protein
-Meat: Beef, Pork, Lamb
-Poultry: Chicken, Turkey, Duck
-Seafood: Salmon,Tuna, Scallops, etc.
 
Plant Foods
-Legumes: Beans, Peas, Lentils
-Certain Vegetables and Fruits
 
Isolates and Shakes
-Whey and Casein
-Pea, Soy, Etc.
-Beef and Egg
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CFSB Nutrition-Matt’s Story

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In this video we sit down with Matt to chat about his experience with our one-on-one nutrition coaching program. Matt's story is unique for a number of reasons. -He was already lean and fit when we started working together -He's a busy financial advisor who has to eat out at restaurants for work a lot -He was looking to improve his athletic performance, -He mainly wanted to learn the tools and develop the habits necessary to eat healthy long-term In the video Matt tells us about: -how he actually SAVED money eating real whole food despite people thinking eating healthy is expensive -how he gained more control over cravings and sugar swings with the program -how things like apples and 70% chocolate actually tasted super sweet after eliminating processed foods -how he learned the tools necessary to eat healthy for the rest of his life. We're super-proud of all your progress Matt! Keep up the great work! __________________________________________________________________________ Transcript: - Hey guys, Robby here from CSFB Nutrition at Crossfit South Bend, and today I am here with Matt who finished up a few months of nutrition coaching not too long ago. Matt, thank you so much for joining us. - Thanks for having me. - So, Matt tell us a little about what eating for you was like before we started working together. - Yeah, I ate just about anything that I saw. I didn't have a lot of discipline in what I was doing, I think that's really what kinda pushed me towards this is I knew that at certain point, you reach a stage in life where you can actually feel that that's not a healthy thing to be doing, but that's how I was all my life, I just ate whatever I wanted to in the moment and, you know, just start seeing the physical effects, so I mean you name it, Doritos were one of - Yeah. my weaknesses, I like sweets, you know, whatever it is, I just ate it. - So, in your mind, you know, you already, you know, you already were and you still are very lean and fit guy, but you had goals for performance. Tell us a bit about kind of what was the main impetus to start with this. - Yeah, well I think it was that thing you always tell yourself that you can still be the athlete you used to be, and just decided I was gonna try and start working out more, and just wasn't feeling the results, and I was talking with some of the coaches about it, it's like, I'm doing this, I'm doing this, I feel like I'm doing the right things but I'm not seeing results and somebody mentioned, you know, hey, have you looked at your diet, and I thought about it, and came and saw you, and yeah, that definitely was a big part of it. - So, tell us a bit about the journey, you know, month one we were kinda transitioning to the Whole30, then we did the Whole30, and then we after reintroduced, tell us about what that experience was like for you. - Oh, and remember with mine we had to delay it so we actually - Right, yeah. had the two month intro, so that took a long time, and I think at one point I just said I'm just ready to start this thing, I can't warm up anymore - Yeah, lets just do it. but it was, it was a big change trying to find, you know, ingredients that I just wasn't used to using. - Right. They weren't things I disliked it's just, you know we were talking about before it just takes the time to get those things together and prepare 'em, and make something happen, but that was a learning experience for me, but it was a good learning experience. - True, good. So, we were just talking about this earlier, you know, we might even do a video on it in the future, so you're a financial advisor over at Edward Jones. Tell people a little bit about, you know, what this was like cost wise, you know people have this persistent myth about food being, healthy food being super expensive, and cooking at home. What are your thoughts on that having experienced it? - Well, I think you can spend as much on the Whole30 as you wanna spend - Yeah. on it, and if you're gonna try and eat out a lot it's gonna rack up the bills, but I was surprised at how inexpensive it can be if you really want to. Simple ingredients, I mean you can get a bag of flash frozen vegetables for a dollar, you can get chicken breast for a, you know, reasonable price, and you can make a full meal that really fills you out of that, but yeah, I think that when people do say that it's too expensive, you gotta look at what they're actually spend their money on, - Right. cuz there are some great foods out there that aren't that expensive, but I think the difference is, it takes time, they're just not convenient foods necessarily. Now, if you wanna do Whole30 and you want it be convenient you're gonna spend a lot of money. You wanna take the time and do it right, you can do it for a reasonable price, no question. - Absolutely. So, one of the things we always like to talk about with people that Whole30 emphasizes this idea of like non-scale victories, so obviously you're at a good body composition to begin with, things changed positively for you, but you were already basically at a good place. Did you notice anything with sleep, or energy, or mood, or cravings, or performance at the gym, or anything like that? - Yeah, the biggest thing were the, it evened out a lot of the swings, you know the sugar swings where you're starving, you have that craving, you wanna grab something to, you know, fulfill that, and then, you know, an hour later you're looking at the fridge, you're looking into the pantry, that type of thing, so I definitely saw much more evening out of those, and didn't feel the drop, and that's what I didn't like, when you feel the drop, you just feel like, man I gotta get a pick me up, and amazing how things that I never would have thought as sweet, like an apple, tasted so sweet, first time afterwards I tried a 70% chocolate, - Yeah. and I thought this is gross it's so sweet, so I would say that was the biggest change for me, and it definitely saw some great results from it. A lot of things in your body that seem to waiver up and down, on the Whole30 they really were evened out quite a bit. - Awesome. So, the last thing we like to ask people is, you know, if you could talk to someone, you know, Matt a few months ago, or someone in a similar position, or you know, one of the things I remember we talked about was, you know, as part of your job you've got a lot of professional lunches, you know, talking to someone who is in a similar scenario, is like, can I do it, can I not? What would you say to someone who's maybe in a similar situation and isn't sure whether they could do something like this? - I mean there's no question, it's difficult, especially if you're on the go lunches, but for me it was really a questions of, and I talked to you about this early on, was the question do I wanna learn how to eat right going forward? - Right. The Whole30 is a temporary time. I think you can get through - Absolutely. 30 days of just about anything. - Yeah. - Can I sustain Whole30 for six months? Absolutely not. - Right, not me neither. But, at least now, what I've taken from this is a wonderful education that, you know, whether I'm, you know, doing a lunch with a wholesale, or something like that, I know which options on the menu are gonna make me feel better, and which ones are gonna make me feel worse. Where before, I just ate what I craved, and always felt bad afterwards, so I would say from that you can get a great education from this, and really help change your choices going forward, and it's worth it. - Yep, yep, absolutely. - 30 days of sacrifice and I get a lifetime education, that's a good deal. - Yeah, yeah, learning the right tools to actually sustain it going forward. Well, I gotta say on my end, I'm super proud of the progress you made, and the effort you put in, you did a fantastic job, and yeah, I appreciate you coming out to tell your story. - Well, I appreciate it and anybody watching this who's thinking about the coaching's just fantastic, and does a great job - Thank you. walking you through it. There's no way you can do it alone. If you can, hat's off but good coaching to through the program, so I appreciate it. - Yeah, thank you very much. Alright guys, thank you so much for tuning in. We'll see you next time.
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How to Weigh and Measure Your Food

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In this video we give a practical demonstration of how to weigh and measure your food, with our guest star Lila the puppy. Do you need to weigh and measure your food to be healthy? Definitely not. As we've said in many other videos, health can be achieved by focusing on food quality and adequate micronutrients (zinc, magnesium, Vitamins C, D, B12, etc.) However, weighing and measuring your food can be useful for things like getting lean, gaining size and strength, and for athletic performance. Also, while weighing and measuring your food isn't strictly speaking necessary for health, there are some cool things you can find out that directly relate to your health like how much fiber, sugar, carbs, protein, and fat you're consuming on a daily basis. It can also tell you whether you are over-eating or under-eating relative to your goals. What do you need to weigh and measure your food? Two things: -A food scale (pretty much any food scale will do) -An app for like MyFitness Pal to enter the weights in (there are other apps as well) How do you weigh and measure your food? For most foods there are three steps. -Step 1: Put raw food that you want to measure on top of the scale (usually on top of parchment paper, aluminum foil, a plate, etc. so the food isn't directly on the scale for safe food prep) -Step 2: Check the number on the scale (this could be in grams or ounces, grams are usually more precise) -Step 3: Enter that number in the food amount section of your calorie counting app like MyFitnessPal. Repeat these steps for all foods. Do you need to weigh and measure foods for the rest of your life? Absolutely not. But taking a 3-4 week period to get data on your most common 80-90% of meals can be a super useful exercise. ______________________________________________________________________ Transcript Robby here from CFSB Nutrition and Crossfit South Bend. Today, I'm here with Lilah, our new addition to the family. She wanted to do a video on weighing and measuring food, so I'm going to do that for her. But I'm going to put her down for now because she'll want to be held for too long. So she'll be wondering around while we're doing the video. Say "hi" Lilah. Cool. Alright. Let's get to it. So people have been asking me for a video on how to actually, practically weigh and measure your food. So let's talk about how to do this. So the first thing we're going to start with is protein, and then we'll move onto the vegetables. Which I've already pre-prepared. So it might be surprising that I'd start with protein you actually don't need to weigh or measure, but I mention this because this is actually going to make things a lot easier for you. This is one pound of ground pork, just split up, on a sheet pan with parchment paper. I have half of this for breakfast and half of this for lunch. I don't need to weigh and measure it because it's already measured as one pound. If I were going to have quarters, I could just easily enter it as quarters. So, that's a really easy way where you don't actually need to put it on the scale and measure it. So that's ready to go. Put it in the oven. On here, on your My Fitness Pal what you would do is, so I've already preloaded this so you guys didn't have to watch me search for it. I'd click my all fresh natural ground pork, and my serving size is one ounce and I have eight ounces of it. If you measured it out on a scale, that would be 227 grams, but again, if you know it's a one pound brick, you don't need to weigh and measure it out. Okay. So. That was protein that was pretty easy to know how to split up. What would you do about a chicken breast? So, let me show you here with this. So I've got my scale over here that you can come around and see, and you'll notice is says 738 on it right now. I'm going to zero that out. And then, normally I would just use my hands to do this, but since I'm going to be handling vegetables, and I don't wanna have to have you guys watch me wash my hands. I'm just going to put this on here with the tong. Hopefully it doesn't slide down for Lilah to eat. And then I put it on the scale. And that says 242 grams, so I would do here in My Fitness Pal for dinner, is my boneless skinless chicken breast. The serving size is one gram. I change that to 242, and it automatically tells me that's 55.5 grams of protein, 3.2 grams of fat, so on and so forth. Check, that's all set. Okay. What if I were doing multiple chicken breasts? All I do is I just zero this out, and then I just add the other chicken breast, just like I added the first one. Okay. So, just put it on there. 224. Zero it out again. And I can do the same thing with this third one. So it's saying that's 134. So if you are doing a meal for bunch of you know if you're doing meal prep for a bunch of different meals or for a family or something like that that can be a good way to just do things all at once. Another important point here guys that I want to make is when you are measuring food specifically protein but also vegetables you want to weigh and measure them raw. That is what the macronutrients values will be listed for on the back of your food, that's what you find in My Fitness Pal. It's going to shrink after you cook it, so you want to weigh and measure it raw. Okay. I'm going to pop this right here, in this oven. Right there I guess. Okay. So that is, the protein. So this is going to be my protein basically for the day. Now let's talk about produce. So. Got another sheet pan here ready. And what we're going to do is the following. So you'll see over here, I've chopped up basically all my veggies for the day. My starch is in the former Japanese sweet potatoes, my kale, my red cabbage. And what I'm going to do now is I'm going to saute this kale. So I've got my stove top preheated here. I'm going to put the kale on the sheet pan, and it's telling me that it's 150 grams, so all I would do here is I would go to my kale and it's one gram measurement and I would change that to 150. And I'm good to go. Do you need to weigh and measure your kale? Not really. Do you really need to weigh and measure anything? No, not really. From a health prospective, you can be perfectly healthy without weighing and measuring anything. But for performance, aesthetics, for certain things in health, like the among of fiber you're having per day, or the amount of sugar, it can be useful. But just to have consistency with weighing and measuring everything I like to just do that. Now, what I'm going to do here is I'm not actually going to weigh the fat of course, but I am going to measure it. I'm going to put a tablespoon of oil into this tablespoon right here. I'm going to drop it into the pan. You can do this with ghee. You can do it with coconut oil. You can do it with whatever it is you'd like to do. And then I'm just going to take this parchment paper toss it in here and that's going to start sauteing. And I'm going to put a couple of scoops in here of some salt. Oh, Lilah you like the Kale? Yeah? Lilah likes to hang around and wait for someone to drop them so she can eat them. Alright. So while that's heating up, I'm going to show you guys the next thing. So the next thing is gong to be my starch for the day. So, in this case, I'm gonna use Japanese sweet potatoes. So I'm gonna to zero my scale out. I'm gonna put one set over there other set over here. Okay. So, that's roughly you know, it's saying 376, so that's, you know, basically a little over one eighty per. So what I do here this is kinda a useful thing I do to just make it so I know, ya know, the rough amount for each portion. You take one tablespoon of oil, for this breakfast portion here, drop it right over that. Do another one for this right here. And then get your salt amounts. You don't have to weigh and measure your salt. I actually do. Not because I am trying to get too little, but because I wanna make sure I get an adequate amount. Salt is very important for overall health, performance, and electrolytes, and a whole bunch of other things. And then, I just mix it up over here. Mix it up over there. And I'm good to go. So what I'm going to do here. Just get a paper towel for my hands real quick. And I'm going to make sure I've got Lilah in check. And then just going to put this in the oven like so. And that's good to go. So, one other one I wanted to show you is. What would you do if you had two vegetables on the same sheet pan? How would you do that? So, I'm just gonna grab this other sheet pan over here. And then and zero it out. I put this set of Japanese sweet potatoes on, I put that set and that's telling me about 212, so that's kinda my dinner amount for the carbs. And then for dinner, I could just go in here, and you know, enter 212 right in there. And then that's telling me that it's 44 grams of carbs for those sweet potatoes. And then, I zero it out again. And. Put this on here. And you can come around and see that this is saying about 323. And again all I do with that is I would just put that in right here in my My Fitness Pal. Okay. So in that case it's 100 grams of, I'm just doing three point two three, but it's the same exact thing. Now for this, since I've got two sets of vegetables I just put two tablespoons of oil. So one tablespoon. Two tablespoons. Put the amount of salt I would typically put on two different vegetables. And then just toss it all up. So it's ready to go. So you don't have ta individualize it like I did the other set of sweet potatoes. You can make it where you're doing bulk vegetables for a number of different people. If you were doing this in a saute pan, you can just drop this into the saute pan. If you were doing it in an Instapot, you can drop it into an Instapot. You don't need to use a sheet pan and parchment paper. But that happens to be what I use for a lot of this stuff. Just because it tends to be easy. Okay. I'm just going to throw that in there. So as you can probably tell this is not all for one meal. This is just me prepping meals basically for the day, so that I'm ready to go. Last thing I'm going to show you guys is how to do this with your fruit. Okay. For this, I'm just going to use a bowl. I'm gonna put the bowl on top of the scale. And. I typically have about 125 grams of blueberries. When I have blueberries. So, all I do here is, you could use your hands, I just like to kinda slide it in there like so. And you can just see that the scale is goin' up as I'm doing it. And then right as I get to right around 125. It's a little bit higher. So all I just do is I just take a couple out. And basically around 125. So. Hopefully that gives you a good sense of how to weigh and measure stuff. Now again, you do not need to do this for health, but a lot of people are getting interested because they want to optimize their performance, or the aesthetics, and there are certain things for health, like your fiber consumption, or your sugar consumption, or your protein amount that can be useful to optimize your health. But you don't, strictly speaking, need to do it for health. But hopefully now, you guys have a good sense of how to weigh and measure things. Thanks so much for tuning in. And we'll see you guys next time.
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What do CFSB Coaches Eat?-Megan’s Story

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In this interview we sit down with Coach Megan to talk about her thoughts on healthy eating. For those of you don't know Megan she is: -currently a high school science teacher -a CrossFit coach -training to be a nutrtion coach -a mom of three In this video Megan tells us: -What eating was like for her growing up -Her personal evolution when it comes to healthy eating -What she currently eats on a daily basis with concrete examples -What she's learned about healthy eating given all the different commitments in her life -What her favorite off-plan foods are -Her favorite special occasions to eat off-plan food. _____________________________________________________________________ Transcript: - Hey guys, Robby here from CrossFit South Bend today I am here with coach Megan and she is going to be telling us about her life with food. So Megan, thank you so much for joining us today. - Thank you. - So first of all, Megan tell us what food was like for you growing up. - Huh, very traditional, cereals for breakfast. My parents both came from farmers. And so they kinda were raised on kinda real whole food initially. So we, although we had processed things like mac and cheese, ramen noodles, they were always like a big favorite as a kid, and cereals. My mom usually made dinner at night. She'd kind of throw together whatever veggies, meat, we'd have lots of butter and whole milk and stuff like that. But yeah, I think their background kind of lended itself. The problem was that is they also loved food and food was always around the table. So portion control and active lifestyle was not necessarily part of our life growing up. - Right, okay, so tell us about your journey through healthy eating. Like when you first started thinking about healthy eating to how you eat now and then we'll get to you know actually how you're eating at the moment. - Okay, so yeah because we always kind of had food and was always making food that was always part of my life. Always how I ate. High school, college, you go off and there's a lot of processed, a lot of convenience, and then got married and you kinda started playing with food, I realized I liked to cook. But there was still a lot of convenience, like Hamburger Helpers in the first couple years of marriage. And so you kind of didn't have, had an idea of what things sort of were healthy but not a real clear idea. And kids, time, fast forward to about three years ago, no? - Yeah, pretty much. - I got into the Whole 90, with you and then did food journaling for a year. And took a lot of I think what a background was and then was able just to change and tweak things. And so now it's very much real whole food, minimally processed stuff, trying to get the healthy fats, the quality protein, the veggies. So yeah, the last, I would say the last three years have been, I've felt really good and confident about my food. And it was not, it's nice because I didn't worry so much about weight. You know, that was always kind of a part of food. Like it was more like food was something I had to manipulate to be a certain way or to look a certain way or and so it's kind of been a nice shift for me within the last several years to I like my food and it doesn't, I know it fuels me and I'm not so worried about having to take something out or limit yeah. - So tell us a little bit about how you are eating now. Like what typical foods you might eat and then you know you brought some meals with you. - Yeah okay, I feel like I have to preface a little bit that I don't meal prep. I have the three kids, I have three kids, a 12 year old, a nine and a six year old. So I'm making dinner every night anyway. So most of our foods are dinners, I make large portions dinner. And then I will sometimes eat that for breakfast or I'll get it for sure for lunch, Mike and I take them for lunch. So, like I said dinners are usually. This is a good one to start with. So this is a pork steak that I don't know can you see, pork steak that we had one night, roast potatoes. We love roasting potatoes. I roast sweet potatoes, potato wedges, big, little potatoes, salt, pepper, whatever seasoning. And then we roast brussels sprouts, we'll roast broccoli, and then we'll kind of have this. Often we'll have, they're like a lettuce, grains, and have a small side salad on there. If you haven't seen my video on the buffalo chicken patties or you haven't checked out that recipe, this is my go to, and we're on the Whole 30 right now so this is like, I make it and I have it in the fridge always. And I put it over greens, and then it comes with like a mayo dressing on top so the fat it's super great. This was dinner last night, cauliflower rice with the teriyaki chicken. There's some chicken down under there and it had like zucchini and broccoli and carrots and onion and pineapple and all over cauliflower rice. So it's a lot of veggies, a lot of protein, I'm very liberal on my fat when I'm cooking. I like my fat a lot so, but it varies, so we have like soup, we love soup, we have soup once a week. It's just different every night. - Yeah. - So. - Those look delicious, very well presented, very easy. - Literally I threw them, like it's just leftovers from dinners this week so. - Yeah they look great. So I always in these videos like to talk about kind of unique aspects of someone's life, you know, Andrew was a college student, and you know, Carl's a rugby coach and all of these different things. So you are an anatomy and physiology teacher. You are a mom of three, you are a CrossFit coach, you are an athlete, you have all these different responsibilities and life things going on. Tell us how healthy eating fits into and relates to that and time constraints and kids and just anything you'd like to talk about with relation to that. - I very much have taken on, in all of this, it's very easy to become overwhelmed and want to like jump headfirst into everything. So as I was thinking back about things, I've taken on the approach of like put on my oxygen mask first. So that's really where it boils down to, is I've figured out what I needed to do for me to feel better personally, better in the gym. And so I made those changes for me and then Mike was like okay if you're making dinner I'll eat whatever you're making for dinner but I'm still gonna eat whatever over here. And then he's come on board, come a long way, just you know slowly, and now we're getting into the kids. So to help with that, like for me, I like to prep, not meal prep, but like I have to have a plan for the week. - Right. - So I make my menus, it's like my thing, if I don't know what I'm making that week, and I haven't gone and bougthen the things it's just, it all falls apart very quickly and it can get ugly. So I make my lists and then, and then we just you know I try to think about what's going on in my week and the easier meals to put together go on those busy nights and then the ones that take a little bit more time is those nights that I'm not coaching. You know, the insta pot is Tuesday, Thursday. Yeah, those are the nights that like I'm coaching, you know, going on. So a part of it, like really when it comes to food, a lot of it is convenience but to keep my family happy like I have to have something that is going to be taste good and that the kids are going to be interested in. If the kids aren't interested into it then life becomes difficult. So it's kind of this juggling like I make it to the quality that I want it to be I just try to search new recipes to fit the family. The time or the picky eaters, the little ones, so. - Good and you're doing a-- - Whole 30-ish, is that-- - Yeah, yeah. - Yeah, so this year was the first year at like, I said Mike kind of got on board and so this year I was like I'm gonna do a Whole 30 in February after my birthday. And so Mike has been eating really well with us and he's like I think we all should. Okay! So I wasn't quite there yet but the words came out of his mouth and then it was kind of like well let's try it, we'll see. So we are doing a Whole 30 with all three kids, ish. Now I would have to say there's certain tweaks that I've, like it's not perfect Whole 30 with kids but little things here or there that we'll let slide. Like I put some plantain chips in their lunch or something like that. But yeah the kids are on day 23, 24, something like that. So the real test is today when they come home with their Valentine's Day candy. - Right. - They know they're to put it in the cupboard and wait 'til next week but we'll see. But it's going really well, you know, the buy-in with the, we talked, prepped them a lot before, before doing a Whole 30. And then some of the buy-in was getting them to look at my recipe books and figure out what they might want to have for dinners. And so then we made the things they wanted for dinners. And sure enough a couple meals that they're like eh, lukewarm on. You know, every night they're like this was good, it was good and they haven't really bocked too much. They do like day dream about doughnuts and candy and bread 'cause you know I had taken cereal out of the house but breads, milk, sugar being the big things that they had to get rid of so. But yeah, it was, I thought I'll give it a week, we'll see how it goes and we're on week, three weeks now. - So-- - Wow. - Yeah. - That's fantastic. - For me it was a success whether it was-- - Yeah, that's huge I mean, yeah I mean to just do it you and Mike let alone you know the entire family I think, that's definitely an amazing accomplishment. - Thanks. Yeah now the tricky part is I have to figure out what I'm gonna, like where do we go after these 30 days. - Right. - So, we'll figure out that. - Cool, let's talk about nutritional off-roading. So as you know very well we typically like to talk about you know completely off planned foods in the context of special occasions. So tell me A about like special occasions that are meaningful to you in terms of food and then B like what are your favorite like, I don't care, I just want to have it. Whatever it is, it's like my favorite off plan food. - Oh, that's a good question. Special occasions, obviously the holidays. But even then I liked what Brandon talked about, you know like if I have to, if I really want it, like and where my willpower is in all of that. You know, I can have holidays and still be really good and say to the dessert. - Right. - There's a certain thing my mom's rolls at Christmas time like-- - Yeah. - Yeah, a lot of my special occasions tend to be I try to like save those for like our anniversary or date nights and usually they are to a special place that we like to go. Like our favorite like pizza is usually my thing. Or wine or something like that, but that, so those are my favorites. We have certain things like special occasions, like tailgates, oh we go camping every year. And like, actually, the last two years have pretty good though but, I don't know. It's hard because there's a context for everything just to say. - Right. - But pizza is a good one, burger, like a really good burger. And if it's baked goods like cake, I really like cake, that's my kind of, but I don't eat it all the time so like it's-- - Right, it's very infrequent. - Yeah. - Yeah. - Yeah, but those are my like-- - Go tos. - Go tos. - That's a good list, I like that list. - Yeah. - It's more me. Okay well, I think I'd like to end with the sense, you know you've already mentioned some great advice to people about you know, put your oxygen mask on first. Is there anything else, you'd like to share about your own personal journey through food or dealing with your family or any other nuggets of wisdom that you've encountered over the years that you'd like to share with others starting out maybe. - Yeah take care of yourself, that's a big one. Every once in awhile, I'll stop and I'll think about how far I've come, especially in my kitchen. I remember when I was first starting and looking at recipes and I'm like coconut amino what? And fish sauce huh? And you know all these things that seemed so foreign and my guess one of my biggest recommendations is to start little, like it doesn't have to be a huge transformation at first. It was, I took this one recipe and I tried the coconut aminos and I made this and I tweaked that and it worked out okay and then it was just little things along the way. So it doesn't have to be a complete 180 or life changing immediately. It was, I did a little bit that I could along the way. Like do your best until you know better and then you do better, you know that quote. And so I've just, okay well I'm gonna try this now and I'm gonna incorporate this. And so and there's no endpoint, like I'm still learning new things and I'm still trying new things. So I just, it's kind of a fun, it's just a constant experiment I think for me. And I just have fun kind of playing with it and learning more and trying more. I don't know, that'd probably be, yeah. - Cool, well thank you so much for being with us today, I appreciate it. - You're welcome. - All right guys, thanks so much for tuning and we'll see you next time.
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How much protein should you eat?

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One of the most frequent questions i get asked is: how much protein should I be eating? As with everything else we discuss, the answer is that it totally depends on your goals, health status, training level, etc. For example, a pregnant woman will need way less protein than a 21 year old male bodybuilder. That being said there are good general guidelines we can give as a starting point. For most active adults, who typically weigh between 100-200 lbs, a good amount of daily protein is: 100-200 grams per day. To make things simple and straight forward from a calculation perspective, someone weighing closer to 100lbs should be getting close to 100g of protein per day while someone weighing 200lbs should be getting close to 200g of protein a day. It's a bit more nuanced than this, and I would argue that for most people for health they only need about 1g/lb of lean body mass. But most people don't know their true lean body mass. So, using weight can be an easy, roughly correct, way to calculate it at home. Whether you calculate this based on 1g/lb of weight or 1g/lb of lean body mass or even based on 20-30% of total calories they're all roughly speaking going to come out fairly close to 100-200g per day for most active adults. What does this amount to in human food? An 8oz or half pound serving of most animal proteins (chicken, fish, beef, etc.) will be roughly 40-50g of protein. If it's leaner like chicken it will be closer to 50g of protein per serving. If it's more fatty it will be closer to 40g of protein per serving. So, to take an example, someone who weighs 150lbs would need roughly 150g of protein, which would be roughly 3x8oz servings of protein a day. In future videos, we'll talk about the differences between different types of protein, and special considerations to take into account weighing and measuring protein. ________________________________________________________________ Transcript: Today we are going to talk about protein. So on a previous video we did, a basic introduction to Macro Nutrients. So this is gonna be part of that series where, after giving the general review and introduction, were gonna talk more specifically, about each of the three macro nutrients. So, we're gonna talk about protein, and then eventually carbs and fat as well. And break 'em down, and make it easier for those of you, who want to start to play with your macros and, start manipulation those, in your nutrition and your diet. An easier way to do that. So, let's first talk about, since this is a, video concerning macros and amounts, let's talk about how much of these things, you should be having on a regular basis. So, I categorized the ranges into, a broad range and a narrow range. So, broadly speaking there's a super wide range, of amounts of protein you could eat. But that really becomes so broad because, on the one end, you know this, 0.36 grams per pound of body weight. That's basically the bare minimum, you need to avoid deficiencies. So for an adult male that'd be something like, 50 grams of protein a day, which is a comically small amount. And then on the upper end, technically speaking unless you have, some sort of health condition, there is no physiological upper limit, to the protein that you can consume. But you'd get pretty full pretty quickly, and it would crowd out other macro nutrients, like carbs and fats so, technically speaking, what physiologically you could consume, these insane quantities of protein, like 400, 500 grams. Technically speaking that's not gonna be, realistically feasible for most people. The other way I put it up here, is in terms of percent of calories. So, 15%, some you could potentially say as low as 10%. 15% of calories is for people who wanna maintain, a lower protein status. You'll see this a lot typically with pregnant women, where the body just sort of naturally says, to decrease protein consumption, from a health perspective, health, of the pregnancy. And then 40% of calories is really kinda the upper end, that you could go there, without starting to run into some potential issues, with balancing out other macro nutrients. The reason why I did a broad categorization of this, and a narrow categorization is that, the broad one gives you a sense of, really how far this range is. But the narrow one is much more realistic for most people. So look. For the vast majority of people, especially those watching this video. If you're doing CrossFit, if you're doing some workouts each week. Something like 100-200 grams of protein per day, is going to be a pretty good place for you to be. Now you'll hear all sorts of metrics out there, some people will say one gram per pound of body weight. Well, that would do pretty well, for people who are between 100 and 200 pounds, which again is the overwhelming majority of people. The overwhelming majority of adults. Some people will say one gram per pound of lean body mass, which is gonna be slightly, lower than, your totally body weight. So, say someone was 200 pounds, their lean body mass might be 160 pounds. So it would be one gram per 160 pounds. But generally speaking this is gonna be, a pretty good range for most of you. 100 being kinda on the lower end, depending on your size and your activity levels. 200 grams being on the upper end. But that's gonna do the vast majority of people, pretty well with what it is they're trying to do. Okay. Yes there's people like Thor the Mountain, from game of thrones who eats way in excess of this, but you are not Thor the Mountain, I am not Thor the Mountain. Most of us don't need you know, 10,000 calories a day, these super physiological doses. So, this is pretty good place for most people. What is that in percentage of calories, about 20% - 30%. That's gonna be a pretty good place. That's gonna help with things like, lean muscle maintenance, and building, fat loss, adequate replenishment of amino acid stores. Things like that. What does that break down to per meal? Well that's gonna be roughly something like. You know it's gonna depend on how many meals, but let's just talk about three to four meals a day, roughly. Four to eight ounces of, protein per meal. So let's say you're in the middle of this range, 150 grams. Eight ounces of protein is roughly 50 grams of protein. So if you have eight ounces of, chicken or ground beef or somethin' like that, that's roughly 50 grams of protein. If you have three eight ounce servings, that would be 150 grams of protein. If you're on the lower end of that spectrum, then somewhere between that, you know four to six range, again some people could maybe go as low as 75 here. But again just givin' you just sort of, a broad range of things, in terms of, how much you should be eating per meal. This is of course all gonna depend on, how many meals you have through-out the day. Some people may prefer to have, smaller more frequent meals, of smaller amounts of protein, rather than larger meals. So, hopefully that gives you a good sense, of how much protein you should be having.
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Eating Healthy as a Nurse-Emily’s Story

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In this video we sit down with Emily to discuss her experience with our one-on-one nutrition coaching program. Emily's story is unique for a few reasons. -She is a nurse, who typically works the night shift -She had actually done the Whole30 before -She was already quite knowledgeable about healthy eating Yet, she was still able to make a tremendous amount of progress during the program. Emily: -Lost 30lbs over 3 months -Lost 12% body fat -Lost 4 inches on her waist -Lost 3 inches on her hips. -Even while losing all that weight her muscle mass stayed the same But even more important than what Emily lost in body weight, inches, and percent body fat is what she gained in terms of eating healthy. Her #1 goal was to get control over food not have food control her, and she definitely did that. In the video she tells us how now off-plan food items are now a choice she can choose to make or not make rather than a compulsion. Great job Emily! We're so proud of you and all your progress! ________________________________________________________________________ - Hey guys, Robby here from CrossFit South Bend. Today, I'm here with Emily who just finished her three months of nutrition coaching. Emily, thank you so much for joining us. - Thanks. - So first thing we wanna talk about, even though it's not just about the measurements, Emily did a fantastic job. And she basically ended up losing 30 pounds while her muscle mass stayed the same, while she ended up losing 12% body fat. And then, 22 pounds of the total weight loss was basically fat. And then she lost four inches on her waist and three inches on her hips. So you did a fantastic job. - Thank you. - How you feeling? - I feel good. I just switched back to night shifts so I'm a little groggy right now, but overall, I feel that, that my body is doing more what I want it to. I'm more in tune with what it is doing. That it's not like, I just am inside of my body, I am, we're together, we're one thing now. - Good, good. So tell us a little bit about what eating was like before you started doing this? - I definitely ate out a lot more. And just something quick. I did try to pick the healthier eating out options, but that's all relative. And then, I did, I guess you don't realize until you start doing the food journal how you're really eating, so I would have probably argued that I ate healthier than I actually did. And then doing the food journal kind of showed that I was eating a lot of red light foods that I didn't have to have. Or like at work, those little mindless snacks that you don't recognize that you have because you're writing everything down. And so almost immediately, I stopped mindlessly snacking because then I had to write it all down and I didn't wanna write down all of those things. So that was like a big eye opener for me, that I was eating things that I didn't really realize that I was eating. And none of those were good for you. Someone will bring chips to work and there would be an open bag. Or occasionally, someone would bring fruit, but that's, you know, once a month versus once a week. So that was definitely a lot of bread, carbs, that like what I would eat out, that's what it would be. And now that's not the case. - Good. So take us through the journey. Take us through like, what was month one like? Where we were gradually working up, and then month two with the Whole30 and then the reintroduction. Tell us how journey was for you, that whole process. - So the first week was just, I did what I had been doing and just wrote it all down. And so, I was surprised that I was like, "Oh, this is what I've been doing." So that was a good, I wasn't terrified at the beginning. And then it was, every goal was something that was accomplishable. And I do remember missing a goal at the beginning and I was really mad about it. But it wasn't like an accusation, it was like, this is like, it just wasn't made. And then from there, it was just like, now I'm making choices of, you know, if I'm not gonna eat as many bad things, which ones would I choose? And then, the final week it was like I don't have to eat anything bad and I think it was almost like a conscious decision to have a glass of whisky with my sister. So, at that point I felt like it was already that control over food was starting to come into play, because you're conscious of what you're eating and you know that this is an actual decision. - And then, in terms of your Whole30 journey, you and I were just talking about this. You were saying you had kind of attempted it before but this time was different. Tell people about that. - So, part of the difference was I didn't do it cold turkey this time, so with the gradual cutback in the month one that made it a lot more realistic for me to believe I could achieve the Whole30. And then moving forward beyond that, my kitchen was ready to accomplish the Whole30. That was a big. I already had all the food I needed with the grocery store tour, I knew I didn't have to make a whole bunch of random sauces myself. Because plain chicken, or whatever, is very boring after a while. So they have all the different sauces that I could buy instead of trying to make them myself. That was a lot more convenient. And then, having the book resource, as kind of what to anticipate per day because it had the days marked out. So then I would read that, or if I was having a particularly bad day, it's like well, that's how I'm supposed to be feeling right now. So that wasn't as scary, and then just knowing that I had support, that I wasn't just off in no mans land doing it myself. - Absolutely. So one of the big things with Whole30 is the whole concept of not in scale victory. You obviously got major scale victories, but one of your main goals that was a non scale victory was control over food and your relationship with food. Tell people about that. - So, after the Whole30 there's been some significant life stress and in the holidays, too. But, it was really important to me to not consciously choose to send Robby an email that said, "Hey I had something I wasn't supposed to, I know you'll forgive me." It was, I know that I don't have to make this decision and it was really important to me to not use food as a coping mechanism, and it was also like I was really proud of myself afterwards because once you finally are done, it's "Okay, I've made it this amount of time without using food as a coping mechanism and now I know going forward that I have the will power and I have the capacity in education, too, to make healthier decisions and to follow up knowing that when I do make an unhealthy decision, I'm not just being ignorant. - So did you experience, besides the control over food which is fantastic, did you experience any other non scale victories like, in energy, mood, cravings, digestion, recovery from workouts, anything of that nature? - I will say I was kind of irritated about the cravings - Yeah. - Because, in relation to my menstrual cycle, they would still come, and so I was really mad because I read the Whole30 book and after you pass a certain point you're not supposed to having the cravings. So that's the only thing that I was a little irritated about but that's realistic. And so, now I know that and so can be proactive about that. Also, I definitely remember it was like October 13th, and I thought the workout here was pretty challenging. But I was really proud of myself, I felt like my body was working really hard and I knew I was taxed but I didn't feel like I was achieving. So I patted myself on the back for the capacity that my body had to achieve the workout, so definitely noticed an improvement there. Since then I got a cold but, you know, it happens. - Right. So, you work as a nurse in a hospital. One of the most overworked, underappreciated jobs in the healthcare field, but harder to be healthy. What would you say to people, and you know, you work the night shift and you're incredible working the night shift. What would you say to people who are like, "Oh my gosh, I work the night shift I can't do this," or, "I work as a nurse," "I work in healthcare, I can't do it," what were your thoughts? - There is always food, always food. And patient's family members will bring us food all the time so, that's a realistic thing that will never change. And a lot of people experience that at their work as well, that there's constantly something that someone brought to share. And so, it was just, "No I can't have that," it wasn't like a big deal and I would just walk away. Because I work 12 hours at a time, and sometimes have to stay over, I always have different nuts in my bag, an EPIC bar, or some kind of dry protein that way. And then typically, whenever like, quick grab type things I would do hard boiled eggs, and sometimes fruit. And then I always take two lunches and two snacks. And people think I'm crazy 'cause I'm like, "I gotta eat some more food," because every two hours I'm sneaking food out which is against all the rules and if anybody from JCAHO, they don't know where I work. Sometimes you're really busy and you don't have time to eat, so making sure that the food I brought was nutrient dense was important. So now I've been meal prepping more regularly I know which foods will sustain me for the majority of my shift, or for a significant portion. And sometimes, I had read, nurses had written about doing the Whole30 and eating healthy at work, and I had read about that she would bring multiple options so that if she didn't want something, she would have something else to fall back on. So that also helped me to maintain staying on track and working nights, they would only offer the night shift menu, which is typically, if they offer a salad, it's scary. And then most of the other options are fried or scary. I don't know they are prepared. So, then you have to be a lot more conscientious that you bring your food. Because a lot of my coworkers will stop on the way to work and pick up something. So it's making sure I get up in time to make breakfast. And even if I take it with me and eat it at work, I still have made it and I have it. So that's been the biggest thing, just being conscientious in that way. - Okay, that's really helpful. And then, I guess the last question I have is, do you think there's a sustainable long term? Do you feel like, I mean obviously you and I have talked about, you know of course you can have pizza for special occasions. But I mean like, generally speaking, 80 to 90% of the time do you feel like this is sustainable long term? - Now I do. If you had asked me at the beginning I don't think I would have, I would have probably lied and said that I believed that I was because that was the right answer. - Right. - But as I had success, just with one, like the meal template itself was successful, and then as I saw success in like, my clothes no longer fit. And then saw success that it wasn't a figment of my imagination either, it was on paper. Those things were encouraging to maintain the changes I was making. So now it's knowing that putting good food in my body means that I will feel better and be more confident that's like I know I'm feeling myself appropriately to do the job that I need to do at work and then to perform well in the gym, and just to live a healthier life and feel better in general. And now I know, even just as we've added the things back in, and we've talked about too many of the yellow things I can tell, it's like, "Oh you are eating too many," because I feel that heavier feeling even though those aren't nearly as bad of the foods I had been eating. So it's also being accountable to yourself that, if I choose to eat something bad I know the consequence that will have. And so, now I feel that I have the education to make an accurate decision. I have the capacity in my kitchen and in my desire to eat healthy. And then, just being persistent that I'm going to choose to do that anyways. - Awesome, absolutely. So, I know I said it before but I'll say it again, super proud of you. Think you did a fantastic job. The numbers speak for themselves, but I think even more importantly than that, just your ability to have control over food and just control your own destiny, so I think you did a fantastic job. So thank you so much for joining us. - Thank you. - For telling us your story. Alright guys thanks so much for tuning in, we'll see you next time.
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Intro to Calculating Macros

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In this video we discuss the basics of how to calculate your macros.
When a dude-bro asks you "Dude-bro, what are your macros?" they're asking what your macronutrient ratios are.
What are macronutrient ratios? They  are a a way of splitting up the total number of calories you eat per day into different amounts of protein, carbs and fat depending on what your goals are.
For example:
-The macros for classic keto are: 20% protein, 5% carbs, and 75% fat -While the macros for bodybuilding might be closer to: 40% protein, 40% carbs, and 20% fat.
There are tons of different ways to split up your macros depending on your goals. In this video we explain how to do a basic, entry-level, breakdown of your macros. This is just one way to do it, and it's not the end-all be-all. But it can be helpful as a way to start.
To do these calculations you'll need your Total Daily Energy Expenditure (TDEE). If you have an InBody scan this is easy to calculate accurately. If you don't you'll have to guesstimate with something like the following calculator.
From there you can use the guidelines we discuss in the video to calculate your macros.
 
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What do CFSB Coaches Eat?-Mike’s Story

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In this interview we sit down with Coach Mike to talk about his thoughts on healthy eating. This video is definitely bittersweet because Mike and his wife Carm, who we very much enjoyed having at the gym, recently moved away. Luckily, we were able to film this video before he moved away. Mike: -is a high-level ultimate frisbee athlete and he talks with us about different nutritional aspects of his sport -works a 9-5 job outside of a gym setting where eating healthy wasn't always as easy as it would be working in a gym setting In this video Mike tells us: -What eating was like for him growing up -His personal evolution when it comes to healthy eating -What he currently eats on a daily basis with concrete examples -What he's learned from years of being an ultimate Frisbee athlete -What his favorite off-plan foods are -His favorite special occasions to eat off-plan food.

2019 Intramural Open at CrossFit South Bend

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What is the CrossFit Open? The Open is the first stage of the CrossFit Games season and the largest community event of the year. Every year, hundreds of thousands of athletes come together to compete in the worldwide, online competition. The Open offers two versions of each workout, scaled and Rx'd. The scaled option makes the event all-inclusive. All athletes can compare their results to others worldwide, regionally, by age or within their own gyms. At the end of five weeks, the fittest move on to the next stages of competition! Here at CFSB we do our own Team Intramural Open where we have you all commit on the whiteboard, split into teams, and do the workouts! This year the Intramural open is FREE! If you still want to sign up for an official capacity in the Open itself, that option is still available as well, you'll just head here to register. All of the information below however is directed toward the CFSB Intramural Open! [eliteaccordion][elitetoggle title="How can I register for the Intramural Open?"] It's FREE! we will be having a spot on the whiteboard Friday the 25th for you to write your name up to commit! [/elitetoggle][/eliteaccordion] [eliteaccordion][elitetoggle title="The Dates/Deadline"] WORKOUT RELEASE DATES AND DEADLINE
  • Week 1 – Thursday, Feb. 21st – Monday, Feb. 25th
  • Week 2 – Thursday, Feb. 28th – Monday, Mar. 4th
  • Week 3 – Thursday, Mar. 7th – Monday, Mar. 11th
  • Week 4 – Thursday, Mar. 14h – Monday, Mar. 18th
  • Week 5 – Thursday, Mar. 21st – Monday, Mar. 25th
REGISTRATION Registration for our Intramural Open begins Friday Jan 25th FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS SCHEDULE Friday Nights at 5:00pm is when the big Friday Night Lights Event will begin, this is the big game night, we will have some talks prior to the open wod starting, then we will be creating some heats and getting after it. Friday Night Schedule: 5:00 Show up at 5 and get your name on the board, we will be setting up and getting all the prep going. I will have stock warm ups and tips up on the board that we will more than likely glaze over. 5:15pm – 8:00pm: We will have you show up at 5:00, and there are a lot of factors to consider, how long the workouts are, how much equipment is involved, how many people show up, and how many heats we will have to run. This may run anywhere from 60-120+ minutes to run. The heats are first come first serve. But I will have a good suggestion on the board for you as to when your heat is, and when you should start warming up VALIDATION TIMES OTHER THAN FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS: This year, if you are signed up and on the team to do the open and you can't make it to our Friday Night Lights event, you may perform it during our regularly scheduled Open Gym Times (during the 5 weeks) Click here to check out the schedule **During these times you MUST bring your own judge or arrange for someone to judge you. **During these times you also must be respectful of class and what is going on at that time - it's possible that the open workouts may take up a lot of space and equipment. Class always takes priority so if you happen to show up and need 2 rowers, 3 barbells, and 40sqft of space - you may have to wait! [/elitetoggle][/eliteaccordion] [eliteaccordion][elitetoggle title="The Intramural Open Explained"] INTRAMURAL OPEN: What is that, and how is it different than the open? The CrossFit Open is a worldwide CrossFit competition. We do it every year. We have since the beginning of the Open, and It’s fun. Last year, over 50 CFSB members tried their hand at this CrossFit “competition.” We want a different goal with the CrossFit Open this year, or heck, just a more specific goal. Our goal at CrossFit South Bend with the Open this year is to educate and inspire. Competition helps with the ‘inspire’ part: the pressure to perform pushes you to train harder; the social boost of dozens of your best friends cheering for you will help you reach a higher plane. Heck, watching your teammates GO is inspiring. Can we bring that worldwide thrill home? Can we deliver all the fun of competition without causing any anxiety attacks? We think so. Through the Open, we’re going to have two intramural teams competing in house. And you’re going to be on one of them. The team captains are... Amy VanDyck for the Green Team Mitch Walker for the Purple Team REGISTRATION AND PRICE It is FREE to sign up for the intramural open this year.  Starting January 25th you simply write your name on the board! THE DRAFT Coaches and members will be ‘drafted’ onto an Intramural team on February 8th and announced! POINT SCORING FOR INTRAMURAL OPEN +1 Point – If you do the workout before the end of our business hours on Monday! +1 Point – Top 3 Rx’d: every male AND female member who places among the Top 3 at CrossFit South Bend for each workout in Rx’d division gets an extra point for their team. +1 Point – Top 3 Scaled: every male AND female member who places among the Top 3 at CrossFit South Bend for each workout in Scaled division gets an extra point for their team. +1 Point to each athlete for their team when they complete that weeks "CHALLENGE" - these will be announced each week the day after the workout is released. These must be done exactly as stated in the weeks facebook live! [/elitetoggle][/eliteaccordion] [eliteaccordion][elitetoggle title="Where can I Order my team T-shirt?"] We will be launching pre-orders for the shirts on February 1st Deadline is Feb 7th by midnight - you will receive a T-shirt color of what team you are drafted on to. Unless you are not doing the open - in which case just write what shirt color you want in the notes when you place your order! [/elitetoggle][/eliteaccordion] [eliteaccordion][elitetoggle title="Where can I find the weekly scoring"] Once the open has begun - I will share a link to a google doc that will be updated weekly[/elitetoggle][/eliteaccordion] [eliteaccordion][elitetoggle title="Want to sign up for the official CF Open online?"] Great! Click here to register! Choose "CrossFit South Bend" as your team! [/elitetoggle][/eliteaccordion] [eliteaccordion][elitetoggle title="Not a member of our gym and would like to get validated?"] No worries! all you’ll have to do is hit up the drop in fee and come in and join us on Friday night, or swing in for a validation time. If you will be in each week to get validated, just ask us about a punch card! [/elitetoggle][/eliteaccordion]