Blog Search

Featured Video Play Icon

CFSB Nutrition-Best of 2019-Olivia’s Story

By: 0

Coming in January 2020 CFSB Nutrition will be offering: -A One-Day Whole30 Seminar at CrossFit South Bend on Saturday January 11th -A dedicated ongoing nutrition class starting Saturday January 18th -One-on-One Whole30 coaching to help you achieve Food Freedom Forever. In preparation for all these big events in January 2020 we're highlighting some of the best client stories from 2019. In this video we sit down with Olivia who did our three month one-on-one nutrition coaching program. For those of you who don't know Olivia her favorite song is "Never Gonna Give You Up" by Rick Astley, which she would routinely play multiple times on her way to the gym. Thus, the title of her story. During the program she: -Lost 10lbs of body fat and 3 inches off her waist -Still made progress even though traveling for 11 out of the 12 weeks we were working together and she was in her last semester of Law School -Was surprised at how easy the transition was to eating healthy because she didn't feel like she was changing everything all at once -Felt like eating this way long-term is definitely sustainable. In terms of Olivia's Non-scale victories she: -Had improvements in her digestion -Said her workouts have been easier and recovery has been better -Said her headaches has made a big difference -Said her emotional eating improved things a lot Congrats Olivia on all your progress! We're super proud of you!  
Featured Video Play Icon

Best of 2019-Ben and Amy’s Story

By: 0

Coming in January 2020 CFSB Nutrition will be offering: -A One-Day Whole30 Seminar at CrossFit South Bend on Saturday January 11th -A dedicated ongoing nutrition class starting Saturday January 18th -One-on-One Whole30 coaching to help you achieve Food Freedom Forever. In preparation for all these big events in January 2020 we're highlighting some of the best client stories from 2019. In this video we sit down with Ben and Amy who did our three month one-on-one nutrition coaching program. What changed? -Amy got way more control over her food choices rather than food controlling her -Both of their energy levels were way better -Ben lost 30lbs and 13% body fat. -Ben got a couple strict pull-ups -Amy's body composition was already quite good when we started, but it got even better throughout the process. They tell us -what life was like before we started working together -how their 3 months of nutrition coaching went. -how their lives changed -how they navigated this program with jobs, kids, and other time commitments -how they plan to stick with the plan long-term.
Featured Video Play Icon

How food can cause stress

By: 0

In this video we discuss how food can cause stress. Here are the main ways that food can cause stress in the body. Proteins-Gluten and Casein -There are certain proteins present in foods like gluten (in wheat, barley, and rye) and casein in dairy that can lead to chronic and systemic inflammation. Carbs-Excess, FODMAPS, Sugar -Excess carbohydrates, the norm today, leads to chronic blood sugar imbalances and potentially dysbiosis in the gut. -FODMAPs, are fermentable carbohydrates present in foods like wheat, legumes, apples, and artichokes, among others that can lead to digestive upset -Sugar in excess, which is the norm today, has no positive health benefits and leads to blood sugar imbalances, cravings, and dysbiosis. Fats-Omega 6 vs. Omega 3 -As a rule most people don't get enough Omega-3 fats, which are generally anti-inflammatory. -Generally, most people get way too many Omega-6 fats, which are generally pro-inflammatory from industrial seed oils, grains, and processed foods. Micronutrient-Deficiencies -If you are deficient in certain vitamins and minerals that is a stress on the body that can lead to stress on the body that leads to cravings Food Additives-Colorings, Preservatives, Artificial Sweetners -These are linked to ADD, hyperactivity, and excess cravings. Food Habits-Reward/Punishment -Using food as reward or punishment or as an emotional comfort is a big source of stress. What's the upshot of all this? Eat as much whole, unprocessed foods in favor of real whole food will tend to help with overall stress levels.
Featured Video Play Icon

How to Plan Your Meals

By: 0

In this video we talk about how to plan your meals. There are four main questions we discuss in this video How do you plan your meals for the week? -All in advance? -Wing it for each meal? -Or somewhere in between? How do you cook your meals? -Everything on a Sunday for the week? -Cook each meal individually at that moment? -Or somewhere in between? How often do you shop for food? -Once a week for everything need for the week? -Go daily to pick things up? -Or somewhere in between? How much variety do you have in your food? -Are all meals the same? -Are all meals different? -Or somewhere in between? We discuss the pros and cons of each option, and then for each specific question I discuss what I do in particular. There's no right or wrong answers to these questions, just what works best for you. But that being said we all have to accept the following fundamental truths. 1. Every possible solution comes with benefits and drawbacks. 2. We are all subject to the same constraints. For example, if you want to eat a healthy diet you're either going to have to cook your own food or have someone else do it for you. Until robots come along to cook things for us those are the two, and only two options.
Featured Video Play Icon

Fat-Special Considerations

By: 0

In this video we talk about special considerations to take into account when counting fat macros. #1-Pretty much any animal protein you consume (beef, pork, poultry, seafood) will contain some amount of fat. This will be on the high end for things like bacon and pork, and on the much lower end for things like boneless skinless chicken breast. Be sure to account for the fat of your protein when tabulating your calories and macros. #2: Don't worry about being 100% perfect. If you put olive oil on a salad there will inevitably be some at the bottom of the plate/bowl that you didn't consume. When cooking meat fat will render out sometimes in a way in which you won't be able to calculate it or consume it. Just do your best when it comes calculating macros and calories. Don't worry about every drop of oil/fat. #3 There are three main ways to incorporate healthy fat in a meal: -Roast your veggies/meat in oil (roasting green beans in coconut oil) -Sauté your veggies/meat in oil (sautéing kale in ghee) -Drizzle oil on your veggies/meat (olive oil on a salad) #4 It's near impossible to meet your daily calorie needs with just protein and carbs with no fat. Fat is important and should not be ignored. Physiologically speaking fat is the main fuel source for most of what we do on a daily basis not carbs. #5 Athletic Considerations- if you're an endurance athlete you can get away with higher fat, lower carb diets since endurance activities involve the aerobic energy system which primarily relies on fat. However, doing things like BJJ, MMA, high intensity CrossFit etc, require more in the way of carbs.
Featured Video Play Icon

CFSB Nutrition Class-Coming Soon!

By: 0

In this video we give you a brief overview of our upcoming CFSB Nutrition class led by our very own Coach Megan. The class will be launching January 2020 here at CrossFIT South Bend We're super excited for this class for a number of reasons: -First of all, coach Megan is an awesome teacher and coach! -The class will allow you to connect with other like minded individuals in a friendly and supportive atmosphere -It will allow you to share your healthy eating experience with people who have similar goals and journeys -It's a way to connect person to person in our increasingly digital world -You'll the science behind why you should eat healthy, but also important practical tips that allow you to fit it into your life -Even if you're not ready for one-on-one nutrition coaching just yet or CrossFit this can be a great way to start with your healthjour ney. We hope you join us January for this exciting new class! Stay tuned as we get closer to January for more details.
Featured Video Play Icon

Guide to Nutritional Off-Roading

By: 0

With the holidays coming up soon people sometimes wonder how they can balance eating healthy with having off-plan foods.
 
In this video we present a guide to nutritional off-roading that will help you through the holidays and the rest of the year.
 
Whether you should have off-plan food or not is entirely up to you, but we help you make that decision easier, by looking at the following 5 factors.
 
-What type of food are you eating? Artisanal pizza in Italy or Pizza Hut?
 
-What type of occasion is it? Your birthday or Arbor Day?
 
-How frequently is it happening? Monthly or Daily?
 
-What's your mindset? Joy/Meaning or Shame/Guilt?
 
-What happens after? Go back to healthy food immediately or keep eating off-plan food for weeks and months on end?
 
Here are a some concrete examples:
 
Better: Your absolute favorite pizza in the world, on your birthday, it's the only off-plan food that month, it brings joy and meaning to your life, and you get right back to healthy eating the next day.
 
Not so great: You scarf down candy from your drawer alone at your desk on a daily basis because you're stressed from work and you "deserve a reward", and this goes on continuosly for weeks and months.
 
Do you see the difference?
 
We hope this helps you navigate off-plan foods during the holiday season.
Featured Video Play Icon

What kind of fat should you eat?

By: 0

In this video we discuss the types of fat you should eat. There are three main categories here of healthy fats: healthy oils, healthy "dry" fats, and the fats contained in your quality protein sources Healthy Oils -Butter or Ghee (clarified butter) -Olive Oil -Avocado Oil -Coconut Oil Healthy "Dry" Fats -Avocados -Coconut -Nuts and Seeds -Olives Quality Protein -Beef -Pork -Poultry -Fish and Seafood
Featured Video Play Icon

Are all carbs created equal? Glucose vs. Fructose

By: 0

Are all carbs created equal when it comes to health? Definitely not. It's a very common mistake to think that carbs and sugar are the same, but they're not. Sugar is a type of carbohydrate, but there are other carbohydrates that are not sugar. Glucose based carbs like rice, white potatoes, corn, oats, etc.: -Are filling, and are less likely to produce cravings -should form the foundation of your carb intake -can be utilized by any tissue in the body (brain, muscles, etc.) -Can be had in quantities up to 300-400g a day depending on someone's carb tolerance. -We suggest somewhere around 100-200g a day for most people Fructose and sucrose based carbs like fruits, sugar, etc. -Are more likely to produce cravings -should NOT form the foundation of your carb intake -are primarily metabolized by the liver -Should ideally not be more than 50g a day from a health perspective. It's entirely possible to eat plenty of healthy carbs from glucose based sources while minimizing sugar intake. So, while fruits and infrequent sugar consumption can be an added layer on top of an already healthy diet they should definitely not form the foundation when it comes to carb intake.

Training for Health or Competition

By: 0

What are you training for?  Health? Or Competition?  Competitor: Someone who is participating in an athletic contest, additionally - there is a difference between someone who competes with the intent of winning or doing better than all others - and someone who has the intention of simply participating. With every level of competition it requires a certain amount of responsibility. Health: The condition of being sound in body, mind, or spirit; especially: freedom from physical disease or pain So you want to be Healthy. When it comes to health and training practices, in the fitness market right now there are a lot of coaches prescribing workouts with no intent behind it. They really aren’t sure on a deeper level why they are giving clients a certain prescription. When it comes to high intensity work. The market believes they can get it, or deserve to do it simply because it exists. A few traits of work that is too intense for the individual Kipping with no prerequisite strength to control upper body deceleration. Using adrenaline to get the work done in a workout Max lifts with shitty mechanics Mechanical fatigue in aerobic environments Huge applause and falling down after daily workouts is what this looks like. If you take someone and assign this work to them, after a few months by comparison to the long game approach they may have a higher capacity, be a little leaner, and higher fitness numbers than the long game person. So it would seem that the high intensity model makes sense.  But very often they’ve created difficult compensatory behaviors and mechanics that will be hard to undo, and will peak their ability very early on, leaving them to spin their wheels having to take 10 steps back in fitness if they want to make progress.  The market prefers fast gains over a short term rather than  Consistent progress over the course of years and years The latter doesn’t sound as sexy.  Most coaches today are being told by the market that they NEED to be giving high intense stuff out or the market will move down the road to someone else to get it When in reality when it comes to health, the most important things are proper resistance training protocols, sustainable aerobic work, behavioral interventions, and nutritional changes.  But when you bring that to the market they are like…”Nah, don’t wanna do it” So what is a coach to do? Give people what they want (unsustainable intense activity) and fast track them?  What we prefer to do is educate you. What intention should look like for the long game.  The goal should be autonomy  Where they client can fend for themselves when it comes to consistency in keeping solid basic lifestyle habits, and making exercise a daily and important part of life. What does that look like? Focus on basic lifestyle guidelines Your behaviors Physical challenges that are just out of your reach - not 10 steps ahead Resistance training and sustainable activities NOT Painful unsustainable work Now there are people who could use doses of unsustainable work. A Sports Competitor, Police, Swat, Firefighter, Military, etc. But don’t put the cart before the horse. Don’t think that if you are any of the above that you should be doing unsustainable, painful work if your stress cup is already full. Meaning they don’t have those boxes checked. They may have Bad lifestyle practices Poor nutrition Choices Unfavorable body composition / health markers Adding stressful training on top of that, adds more stress onto an already stressed system. Okay, so you are competing Are you participating or competing?  It’s the difference between  casually kicking a soccer ball around on the weekend with your kids, then signing up to play in a high school soccer game.  Or  Positioning your lifestyle habits, training, and goals to meet that of the level you intend on competing at. Then preparing appropriately and competing. Its understanding The sport are you competing in  The demands of the sport What is required from you on all fronts, both in and out of the gym Where YOU sit in comparison to what is required of the sport when it comes to your genetics, resilience, movement quality, sport specific KPI’s, fitness IQ, intent, etc What it takes to bridge the gap between where you are, and where you want to be Depending on the sport, you may have to first have the prerequisites of everything we mentioned in health - passing through health and into performance. You don’t skip good behaviors to get to elite performance, and if you do - you may not be there long.   From there, high levels of performance in the sport may be closer to sickness than health due to what is required of the athlete to always be pushing toward their maximum potential.  So what are you training for? Health, or Competition?